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  • #46
    Absolutely ripping movies Peter!

    I couldn't agree more with David's comments. You have explained and demonstrated things perfectly,.

    Good to see you back in action,

    Cheers Charlie

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Blue62 View Post
      Peter,
      The latest video on the Healey guard (part 3). is just outstanding.
      I have watched it three times today LOL.
      As you know I have attempted that panel several times I was able to do a sort of decent job once but it took me forever.
      There are a number of things that you have been saying in all your video's that are finally starting to sink into my thick head.
      Things like opening the panel to work it then closing it to check the shape. I am finally seeing the value of that principal.
      This particular panel really drives home the idea of opening a panel to work it because this panel is hard to work closed.
      Especially for a beginner and I was always trying to work it closed.

      Another thing you say is let it out or let some shape out.
      Because I have been doing the shape in shape out exercise lately. Now I get it, now I see what your saying and even better, now I can do it
      Very valuable thing to know.

      Then there is the "you can adjust it" I never understood that idea until this series of video's on the Healey guard.
      I was always trying to get every line on a finished panel to fall or come out exactly where it had been laid out on the blank with the paper pattern.
      Hey guess what that"s really hard to do LOL.
      Now I know there is some latitude, some adjustability actually some forgiveness in shaping a panel.

      So now because of these video's I have a greater understanding of how to shape a panel.
      Also a greatly increased amount of confidence in making a Healey rear mudguard.
      I am going to do this panel again.
      But I am going to wait I want to see video N4.
      Also I am going to change my E-wheel a little bit. It is on a stand just like Yours Peter but with wheels that lock on it so I can move it around.
      Those caster wheels even when locked still allow a bit of movement.
      I am going to set it on cinder blocks so the wheels are off the ground. Should be rock solid that way no more movement from the caster wheels.
      Also I am going to see if I can find some rubber pads to go between the stand and the E-wheel itself.
      Then maybe I will feel more in my hands when I wheel so I can feel the highs and lows better

      Thanks Peter for the video's Fantastic.
      2nd that....😉. It’s like a drug you want more....😂

      certainly keeps you thinking.😎

      thanks Pete...

      I just wish my youngsters here at work would share my passion and your passion For the skills you are kindly showing.

      youngsters today can easily get distracted by all the other shit on YouTube.

      You can leave this earth knowing you’ve helped many people....BUT maybe not just yet LOL.
      https://www.precisionpanelcraft.co.uk/

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      • #48
        This would have to rate as Peters most informative video series and the fact that it has raised a few "Ah ha " comments is testimony to that. There is so much information that Peter has put in there that we all probably need to watch it numerous times to glean the knowledge. You guys are been personally been tutored by a metal shaping master. That is a bit of a privilege ..... Fantastic Peter. !!

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Kiwi john View Post
          This would have to rate as Peters most informative video series and the fact that it has raised a few "Ah ha " comments is testimony to that. There is so much information that Peter has put in there that we all probably need to watch it numerous times to glean the knowledge. You guys are been personally been tutored by a metal shaping master. That is a bit of a privilege ..... Fantastic Peter. !!
          John,
          You are so right I watch Peters video's over and over. Then I put them away for a month or two then bring them out and watch them again.
          Every time I watch them I see something I didn't see before.
          Peter explains things very very well but there is also loads if information that is unspoken.
          An example:
          When he uses a hammer and dolly to begin to clean up a line he has blocked out like on the lower part of the Healey guard.
          Or in his video on the Monaro quarter when he demonstrates on dolly and off dolly work when cleaning up a line.
          He is so fast and so precise, there is so much happening with the metal so quickly that I wish I could zoom in and go to slow motion



          David Bradbury

          Comment


          • #50
            Hi David. I think the guys on the forum ( and girls ) are beginning to see a little of the skill that Peter has. We are able to drop in and say hello and his passion for the craft is contagious. There would not be many who would share their knowledge like Pete does. There's so much to learn that its sometimes a little overwhelming but he is a damn good teacher to those who trust in his teaching.
            He expects us to apply what we have learnt and challenges us to think critically about the process. You could not be in better hands. You need to watch his videos over and over but more importantly you need to apply those teachings. We have the same raw materials and tools. Most of us just don't have 100k hours plus of experience yet. Peter will provide the knowledge but you need to do the miles !!!!!

            Cheers John

            Comment


          • #51


            As I mention when we first started this Forum , ......... We are going to make this Forum the best ever ,even if we do have a bit of criticism every now and then about certain methods and theories .

            .All involved with the Forum Thank you !, All of the members Thank you !.

            Peter T.
            Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 25-03-21, 11:03 AM.

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            • #52
              Terrific videos Peter.
              Thanks.
              Pugsy

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              • #53
                I am slowly watching and letting it sink in 15 minutes or so at a time,,,,,,,but Peter you are doing a great job ,

                One question , if you were by yourself how many work hours from start to finish would this job take ?

                and if you were doing it without filming would you use more machines ( which most of use do not own)

                Thanks again for taking the time to teach us ,

                Comment


                • #54
                  Originally posted by abarthdave View Post
                  I am slowly watching and letting it sink in 15 minutes or so at a time,,,,,,,but Peter you are doing a great job ,

                  One question , if you were by yourself how many work hours from start to finish would this job take ?

                  and if you were doing it without filming would you use more machines ( which most of use do not own)

                  Thanks again for taking the time to teach us ,
                  Interesting question ...........

                  The reason why I did it with hand tools is simply because no every body has a the equipment that I have . SO ...if I was to block and shape that panel in the pneumatic air hammer i would say that the rear part of the guard would have taken about 1 and half hour,.... then possibly another 2 hours to smooth it up on the wheel .
                  The front of the guard possibly 1 hour to block and shape + another hour also to finish it off , THIS DOES NOT INCLUDES paper patterns cutting the blank , profiles, and turning all edges .

                  The way as seen on the video the two panels including filming and dialogue took about 6 hours . having said that the whole guard FINISHED AND FITTED TO THE REAR SHROUD should take between 35 hours and 40 hours,. probably less depending on the experience of the operator but if it was to take you guys longer I would not worry the idea is to learn and be able to do it !
                  Peter T.
                  Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 26-03-21, 12:19 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #55
                    Hi Pete,

                    If I popped in with a packet of cigarettes and some Tim Tams would I be able to take a copy of your templates and paper pattern ? I would like to try to duplicate what you have done by following the tutorial only. ( and not improvising with the bad habits I have absorbed over the years )

                    Maybe if a few others were to do the same we could have a little competition where we post the progress and the person that follows your methods the closest wins a small prize. Perhaps a Handbuilt hammer ? ( or a cast wheel or air hammer ? )

                    Comment


                    • #56
                      Hi Peter , thanks for your reply ,

                      so with your 1000s of hours about 8 hours to do it with the air hammer and other tools of destruction !

                      at that rate I can see how you could make a little money at the end of the day if it was a customers car ,

                      But you know what you are doing and do not have to go backwards to fix up a mess you got in ,

                      I never plan on doing this as a job , and my time is my own , but I can not see someone just starting ever making a decent paying career out of this.....

                      Again thanks for all your advise.....

                      PS , I read again what Peter wrote and the 8 hours above was just for the basic form and not all the finish work , edges etc so now we are up to 40 hours......



                      Last edited by abarthdave; 26-03-21, 09:18 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #57
                        Originally posted by Kiwi john View Post
                        Hi Pete,

                        If I popped in with a packet of cigarettes and some Tim Tams would I be able to take a copy of your templates and paper pattern ? I would like to try to duplicate what you have done by following the tutorial only. ( and not improvising with the bad habits I have absorbed over the years )

                        Maybe if a few others were to do the same we could have a little competition where we post the progress and the person that follows your methods the closest wins a small prize. Perhaps a Handbuilt hammer ? ( or a cast wheel or air hammer ? )
                        Now your talking I like that idea
                        So john what are Tim Tams???? I am in the USA


                        David Bradbury

                        Comment


                        • #58
                          Originally posted by Blue62 View Post

                          Now your talking I like that idea
                          So john what are Tim Tams???? I am in the USA

                          It's a cross between a candy bar and a cookie. English, Ozzies and Kiwi's call it a biscuit.

                          https://www.google.com/search?q=tim+...nt=firefox-b-1

                          To all my Culinary challenged English, Aussie and Kiwi friends, this is what a proper biscuit looks like.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	buttermilk-biscuit-1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	137.4 KB ID:	5764

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                          • #59
                            Thanks Chris,
                            I should have googled it
                            David Bradbury

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                            • #60
                              Originally posted by Peter Tommasini View Post

                              ...

                              The way as seen on the video the two panels including filming and dialogue took about 6 hours . having said that the whole guard FINISHED AND FITTED TO THE REAR SHROUD should take between 35 hours and 40 hours,. probably less depending on the experience of the operator but if it was to take you guys longer I would not worry the idea is to learn and be able to do it !
                              Peter T.
                              That's actually kind of shocking, because it looks like you're about 95% done. I would have guessed another couple hours to weld and metal finish the two pieces together, then maybe a few hours to finish off the edges/flanges. (a few hours for you, not for most folks ;-) What's the biggest task in the last 30 hours?

                              This Healey guard is truly one of your best video series Peter. I like how it goes in order of difficulty -- you start out making a simple bulbous panel and showing how to keep control, but by the end you're doing precision fine tuning of a reverse, which I still don't fully understand but keep watching. Was interesting you were able to do that without flipping the panel over.

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