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  • English Wheel Techniques

    Hi Guys,
    Here's another video on Wheeling techniques, along with some tips.
    Hope you enjoy.
    Cheers
    Peter

  • #2
    Here's part 2...
     

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    • #3
      Hi Peter,
      Just watched both video's .
      I also went back and again watched the video's on reading paper patterns.
      Also again watched the first video on making the Ferrari nose panel.
      I think I am beginning to see how the same principals and methods are used to make both the upper and lower front nose pieces.
      Which makes sense as they are so similar in shape.
      Thanks for posting the video's always great to see how you master the metal.
      Hope all is well with you and your family and that you are healthy and safe during this virus pandemic.
      Take care.

      Dave Bradbury
      David Bradbury

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Blue62 View Post
        Hi Peter,
        Just watched both video's .
        I also went back and again watched the video's on reading paper patterns.
        Also again watched the first video on making the Ferrari nose panel.
        I think I am beginning to see how the same principals and methods are used to make both the upper and lower front nose pieces.
        Which makes sense as they are so similar in shape.
        Thanks for posting the video's always great to see how you master the metal.
        Hope all is well with you and your family and that you are healthy and safe during this virus pandemic.
        Take care.

        Dave Bradbury
        Dave you are right, the panels a very similar, the difference between the two is that the lower panel is flatter at the rear, which makes a bit more difficult to shape and blend
        Peter T.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you for the new videos, Peter. Very much appreciated. I'm looking forward to getting caught up and spending time using my english wheel asap.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you Peter!

            Comment


            • #7
              Fantastic Peter!

              I am sure this is exactly what I will have to do, to make new door skins for my Alpine,

              Cheers Charlie

              Comment


              • #8
                I knew it would be Neil's fault... Good stuff Peter and thanks for taking the time to post. Just starting to shape the panels for the BMW, so very timely
                Cheers, Richard

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                • neilb
                  neilb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  huh obviously is..... lol

                  peter and i spoke about carrying on doing the video's a few weeks ago, it's during the beer virus restrictions, it makes it difficult to travel around. glad peter has carried on with it.

                  don't forget to post some pics of the bmw!

              • #9
                Beer virus restrictions? How do you battle the virus without beer
                David Bradbury

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                • #10
                  Thanks Peter, Looking forward to more videos.
                  Anton’s
                  Robert J Anton
                  4 Tenbrook Industrial Park
                  Arnold, MO 63010-3128
                  [email protected]
                  636-296-4433

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    We are very fortunate that Peter is so willing to share his knowledge so freely. I for one am really grateful to you Peter. 👍

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Thank you so much for sharing these Peter, this kind of info is not easy to find!!

                      I do have one question (and maybe others on here can answer it). One part of your technique is that you seem to set the handwheel at relatively light pressure and then indirectly regulate pressure by pulling down or up on the panel. For example: on the first video from 11:40-12:45, you demonstrate and talk about the importance of where to pull down on the panel so you can add curvature to exactly the right place so that it will fit perfectly on the buck.

                      In the second video, you fix a panel with a loose edge. You start wheeling at around 19:00 and you say to pull down a little bit. At 19:10 you say, "it's not coming so we need to lift it." For the next few minutes you demonstrate lifting the panel as you wheel it. At 20:23 you say, "I've got a little bit of pressure there and I'm pulling upwards."

                      This is great stuff as I have never seen the technique demonstrated before, nor have I ever seen anything written about it. My question is: When do you decide to pull down on the panel, and when do you pull up?

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        joe, this is why the craft was taught. it's almost impossible to write down the technique of what to do where and when. feel is important as visual

                        the correct technique is very important, think of some pasta dough you put it through a pasta machine and every pass you tighten the rollers, the dough gets thinner. imagine what the steel is doing when you crank up the pressure using the wheel? same thing... it gets squashed and pushed along until you stop, then you get a lump. light pressure and technique is quicker and produces far better results.

                        pulling down puts shape in, lifting up removes shape

                        lets hope i got that right or peter will slap me lol
                        thanks neil

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Originally posted by joeswamp View Post
                          Thank you so much for sharing these Peter, this kind of info is not easy to find!!

                          I do have one question (and maybe others on here can answer it). One part of your technique is that you seem to set the handwheel at relatively light pressure and then indirectly regulate pressure by pulling down or up on the panel. For example: on the first video from 11:40-12:45, you demonstrate and talk about the importance of where to pull down on the panel so you can add curvature to exactly the right place so that it will fit perfectly on the buck.

                          In the second video, you fix a panel with a loose edge. You start wheeling at around 19:00 and you say to pull down a little bit. At 19:10 you say, "it's not coming so we need to lift it." For the next few minutes you demonstrate lifting the panel as you wheel it. At 20:23 you say, "I've got a little bit of pressure there and I'm pulling upwards."

                          This is great stuff as I have never seen the technique demonstrated before, nor have I ever seen anything written about it. My question is: When do you decide to pull down on the panel, and when do you pull up?
                          .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. ..........................

                          Joe this is going to be harder to explain then to do the job it self Ok.... so .... has you saw on the video , at one point the panel was curling too much from top to bottom, so by applying a bit more pressure on the wheel i could still wheel the hollow out BUT!!!! in order to straighten the panel to where it needed to be I pull upwards a little towards the top wheel starting from the middle of radius shape at the top (where I blocked ) .As you saw by pulling down WAS NOT going to work in this case . so by pulling upwards, what was happening is that some of the shape that was blocked on the radius was drag to the flat part and filling that hollow in the middle of the panel at the same time. As you saw the edge was straightening , the edge at the bottom was concave simply coursed by the hollow in the middle ...but once the material was drag where the hollow was the edge started to be where it should be. this method is very useful when doing a certain amount of stretching in a panel (the like of door skins , wheels inner arches, and panels like the one I showed etc ) keep in mind that the same thing can happens when a lot of heavy wheeling is done as well , that is why I personally like to take my time and do a little by little and check everything as I go (Just like on the video) and that is also the reason that I said many of times ... USE FULL RADIUS ANVILS ,and DO NOT USE EXCESSIVE PRESSURE ... if you look at the video again even when I was applying some pressure, there was always a gap between the two wheels..It takes a bit of practice ..and with that comes experience, to know when what to do, and what not to do, and as I said before I am not better than anybody else I SIMPLY HAD 50 YEARS OF PRACTICE , and keep working in the traditional ways ( withing reason ) ( by the way the panel in question took 2 hours to block and shape up, .......and two ours to finish off get all the ripples out, stretch the last inch at top again anneal it, and turn the edge over . I will post some pics of the finished panel on the buck soon.
                          .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................................. .................................

                          As far as you question about the first video versus the second one....... the techniques are the same just use less pressure as you getting towards the end result. All the heavy blocking , stretching, dragging, bending, opening the panel etc must be done early in the stage of making any panel, till it ruffly fits on a buck or matches your profiles...ONLY THEN ... you go to the smoothing stage and finishing off , you CAN NOT block smooth , then block some more, then smooth, then block again and again then smooth again while the panel is not in it's right arrangement .........
                          ( just like some I know ) That is a guaranteed way to get in trouble !
                          I hope that my explanation can help you some how
                          cheers
                          Peter T.
                          Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 15-04-20, 02:54 PM.

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                          • #15
                            Good point Neil, when you watch Peter with the wheel you realize that he's playing that thing like a musical instrument. Not easy to learn to play the violin from a book!

                            Thanks so much for your explanation Peter. You say above:

                            so by pulling upwards, what was happening is that some of the shape that was blocked on the radius was drag to the flat part and filling that hollow in the middle of the panel at the same time.
                            So is this the primary purpose for pulling up? To drag shape from one part of the panel to another?

                            In playing around with scrap pieces, I've found that pulling down hard will generally bend the piece into a barrel, but when I straighten out the barrel (by stepping on the piece), or if I flip the piece at 90 degrees and again wheel pulling down hard, I find the piece has domed up a lot.

                            Will pulling up stretch the panel without this additional bending? Or do you usually pull down and then straighten the piece afterward? I guess I need to run some more experiments.

                            This whole technique of pulling up and pulling down seems to give the operator much more control than just setting a pressure and wheeling away. I *think* the act of pulling up or down is a way of increasing the pressure that the panel sees, but since you're doing it while wheeling you can selectively increase the pressure in very specific areas. Plus by pulling down you can use the wheel to bend the panel into its final arrangement at the same time you are wheeling. It seems this would give very high productivity if you know what you are doing. Thanks again for the demonstration Peter!!
                            Last edited by joeswamp; 15-04-20, 03:31 PM.

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