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  • Interesting shape

    Hi Guys,
    Here is the video of the shape for the Ferrari mud guard
    Hope you enjoy
    Cheers
    Peter T

    https://youtu.be/fucMmUPWrOw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05pA...ature=youtu.be
    Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 05-25-2020, 01:18 PM.

  • #2
    Thank you Peter!

    Comment


    • #3
      I have watched them 3 times each
      Peter the way you pointed out so many details on the paper pattern was fantastic.
      Really helps those like me in learning this craft.
      Thinking maybe I should spend some serious time just making and studying paper patterns.

      Like a lot of people I always thought returns or reverses were hard to do.
      I have found that they are not really that hard to do.
      What I find hard to do is the blending of one area into another.
      Like bulbus shape into a return.

      Another thing I realized from watching these latest video's is that I am not keeping an eye
      on areas that can go hollow. By the time I see it I have lost control of the panel.
      Then I make a mess of things trying to get the hollow out.
      Thanks for doing the videos I will try to put what you show into practice.

      The rear guard looks interesting
      David Bradbury

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Blue62 View Post
        I have watched them 3 times each
        Peter the way you pointed out so many details on the paper pattern was fantastic.
        Really helps those like me in learning this craft.
        Thinking maybe I should spend some serious time just making and studying paper patterns.

        Like a lot of people I always thought returns or reverses were hard to do.
        I have found that they are not really that hard to do.
        What I find hard to do is the blending of one area into another.
        Like bulbus shape into a return.

        Another thing I realized from watching these latest video's is that I am not keeping an eye
        on areas that can go hollow. By the time I see it I have lost control of the panel.
        Then I make a mess of things trying to get the hollow out.
        Thanks for doing the videos I will try to put what you show into practice.

        The rear guard looks interesting
        David
        thank you for your kind comments, the rear guard is a little like what you are trying to make, use my method ,get the return deeper ,then bend it if not OK, find out the problem ,open the panel up and work accordingly. BUT most importantly use profiles to guide you
        Peter T.
        PS If I am right ...you have on of my wheels? If so go slowly, pull up on the top wheel and try to FEEL the panel ( very important ) as well as watching it. You will get there! Post some pictures of you pattern and profiles + the blank I might be able to help you trough
        Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 05-26-2020, 01:33 AM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Peter
          Thanks for your help and tips.
          Yes I have one of your Wheels
          Excellent memory Peter.

          I think I will spend some time with the paper patterns to see if I am missing any info they can give me.
          Then I will start from scratch with the front half of the rear guard on my Austin Healey.
          I will take pictures and post them.

          I get the idea of feeling the panel when one wheels.
          That is something I have tried to train myself to do.

          You mention in the videos that you feel things you can't even see when you are wheeling a panel.
          this leads to a question.
          If I remember correctly Will Cronkite stated that you mount your wheels with a rubber pad between the wheel frame and the legs.
          Does the rubber pad help you feel lows or highs when your wheeling? Or is there some other reason for the rubber pad?
          David Bradbury

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Blue62 View Post
            Peter
            Thanks for your help and tips.
            Yes I have one of your Wheels
            Excellent memory Peter.

            I think I will spend some time with the paper patterns to see if I am missing any info they can give me.
            Then I will start from scratch with the front half of the rear guard on my Austin Healey.
            I will take pictures and post them.

            I get the idea of feeling the panel when one wheels.
            That is something I have tried to train myself to do.

            You mention in the videos that you feel things you can't even see when you are wheeling a panel.
            this leads to a question.
            If I remember correctly Will Cronkite stated that you mount your wheels with a rubber pad between the wheel frame and the legs.
            Does the rubber pad help you feel lows or highs when your wheeling? Or is there some other reason for the rubber pad?
            David the rubber pads do help I felt the difference as soon as I put them on,it seems to me that they cut any vibrations when wheeling I also have a rubber mat under the stand as well , and I honestly can say that it makes a difference when wheeling. Let me give you an example.... just imagine how wheeling would feel if the wheeling machine was mounted on wheels and move around the floor while one is working whit it or if the steel stand was moving and rubbing against the concrete floor ....THEN think of the rubber pads.... not only between the cast and the stand,but also between the stand and the concrete floor
            Peter T.

            PS if the paper pattern does not give you the info and you think you are missing something........................ you can always use the FSP LOL Sorry I had to mention that and I am still laughing

            Comment


            • #7
              Peter
              The difference with the rubber pads is very interesting.
              I actully figured out something about wheeling correctly.
              I was thinking the rubber pads cut down on vibrations.
              Wo Ho I am making progress in my thought process.

              Ok any more jokes about the FPS and I will make one of a kite and mail it to you
              I tried a FSP one time, that cured me.
              David Bradbury

              Comment


              • #8
                Thank you for videos and more explanations, Peter. I really appreciate the long view of the component shapes and how to both achieve and integrate them in a single panel.

                Edit- how thick is the rubber under the feet of your wheel? Is it similar to the thin pad between the cast frame and stand or thicker like a typical anti-fatigue rubber floor mat?
                Last edited by cliffrod; 05-26-2020, 12:50 PM. Reason: crs - forgot to ask...

                Comment


                • #9
                  David.... if you made progress on your thought , you will be making progress on your skills as well trust me when I said this, thinking and trying ( even if sometime it does not work) is part of learning and that is how it all starts
                  Peter

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
                    Thank you for videos and more explanations, Peter. I really appreciate the long view of the component shapes and how to both achieve and integrate them in a single panel.
                    Cliff ..... any time..... if I can help, I will help, do not be afraid to simply ask
                    Peter

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
                      Thank you for videos and more explanations, Peter. I really appreciate the long view of the component shapes and how to both achieve and integrate them in a single panel.

                      Edit- how thick is the rubber under the feet of your wheel? Is it similar to the thin pad between the cast frame and stand or thicker like a typical anti-fatigue rubber floor mat?
                      Cliff I used a normal 2 mm thick rubber mat
                      Peter

                      Comment


                      • cliffrod
                        cliffrod commented
                        Editing a comment
                        Thanks, Peter.

                    • #12
                      Thanks Peter,
                      I am 70 years old and didn't start playing with this metal shaping thing until about 2 years ago.
                      I find this craft fascinating.
                      Never to old to learn something new.
                      I just hope I don't run out of road before I get a fender made correctly
                      David Bradbury

                      Comment

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