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Strewth Bruce! A Jiggly Machine Video.

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  • Strewth Bruce! A Jiggly Machine Video.

    Just stumbled upon this - very clever chap making a windscreen frame for a 1920's Dodge.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAYv...&fbclid=IwAR30 X5OglCUBZ6stkcjSt_HzfS-Vxrch3_WZCdPXVhg1wtuOipX3gvQ7c_s

    Y'all in the US might need an Aussie Accent Babelfish, but worth the effort.

    I need to make me a little jiggly machine next.
    Cheers, Richard

  • #2
    good find richard, great video! thanks for posting

    i was thinking of making my jiggly a little bigger throat wise, all this spare time with stage 4 lockdown is giving me too much computer time lol
    thanks neil

    Comment


    • skintkarter
      skintkarter commented
      Editing a comment
      He's a clever bloke - I've pointed him here. Bloody clever Aussies. Who would have thought there were more than 3...?

  • #3
    Just a question that arises from watching this. If you are doing this for a living would you charge for the time it takes to make the tooling, trial and error etc? Or would you only charge for the time to make the part once you have the tooling and have a pretty good idea of the process?
    Seems to me the "figuring it out" stage would be a much longer time than the actual time it takes to make the piece.
    Last edited by Chris_Hamilton; 08-23-2020, 02:16 AM. Reason: grammar

    Comment


    • neilb
      neilb commented
      Editing a comment
      good point chris, i'd say a combination of both, if you can't buy them how can anyone put a price on them?

    • MP&C
      MP&C commented
      Editing a comment
      I've got two lines of thinking on a case like this, if the part is so obscure that its likely you'll never do another, then its part of doing the job and is billed as such. If its a generic shape (like a beading tool) that will more likely than not get used on another job, I'll discount the labor to make the tooling and add some of that "development" time on the next jobs that come in that use the same tooling.

  • #4
    Chris if you are charging for something, then charge for it, as if you don't, you won't be around next year when folks need you again...

    A mate came to me with a couple of fuel pump and fuel filter brackets from a long lost Eggenberger Group A Volvo 240 Turbo touring car. Car had been sitting outside for a number of years and the boot had filled with water. The brackets obviously were not painted as well at the boot floor and had suffered badly. These were probably made as a small batch back in the day, but no spares available and Rudi had recently passed away. Try $3500 for 2 fuel pump brackets by the time I had finished. I made 4 in the end as they were not that tedious to make once I had made the die for the swage. I think that I charged my time at $50 per hour (NZ). Had to sacrifice one and unpick it to flatten out, had a mate scan it and then waterjet the parts from 2.0mm sheet. Owner was chuffed and hopes to run the car next year.

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    Cheers, Richard

    Comment


    • MP&C
      MP&C commented
      Editing a comment
      Well done Richard, and I'll have to admit, I had to look up "chuffed" to see if you were still on speaking terms with the guy..

    • skintkarter
      skintkarter commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Robert. I've done a few bits and pieces now for the chap and his son - stuff that it's difficult to bug a regular shop to do. They happen to be the local Brembo importers and let's just say that the racecar has some very nice 1 piece squeeze forged calipers at each corner - 2.3kgs each It jolly well should stop!

  • #5
    Those braces look outstanding Richard! I for one would love to see a thread on how you did it.

    Comment


    • #6
      Cheers Chris. Other than making the die for the swage in the milling machine, it wasn't too tricky and I never took note of the process. Once my mate scanned the flattened original, cleaned up the drawing and cut me out several sets of bits (I think 6 sets in all) it was just the matter of working out the bend sequence in the folder, after pressing in the swage. Sacrificed one of the sets to work out the process. I think that the final 4 were made in around a day and then I just bead blasted them and treated them with Epiphos. They are a neat design (typical Eggenberger) and the filter gets retained with a couple of O rings just looped over the small ears. Greatest amount of time was really the thinking - which if you are doing this stuff for a living, you need to be charging for on a one off.
      Last edited by skintkarter; 08-23-2020, 04:31 PM.
      Cheers, Richard

      Comment


      • #7
        Nice video, good to see others methods for making dies...

        Comment

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