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Planishing hammer- floor frame build

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  • #16
    Wood as a material frame could be very interesting.... could be very good in taking out micro vibrations.
    https://www.precisionpanelcraft.co.uk/

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    • #17
      There is no glue, just held together by the threaded rod by brute force.
      It has almost sixteen inches depth. I want to use it for making motorcycle tanks and guards.
      One mistake I made was using lumber that had not dried out, it was still very wet when I made all the pieces and there has been a fair amount of wood shrinkage causing gaps in the joints that were tight.
      As far as I can tell, there is no flex when using it and I was surprised how hard it was hitting, even on half speed. I will have to work on that and getting some better tooling made for the top (driven) anvils.
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      Last edited by Steve Murphy; 13-12-20, 09:42 PM.

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      • #18
        Interesting idea , how loud is it ?

        there are some nice Bosch rotary hammers with 5-10 speed settings

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        • #19
          It still makes noise, but it’s not too bad, compared to my pneumatic zip gun planishing hammer. I would like to try a newer variable speed hammer, it would probably work better. I am using a router speed control on this one.

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          • #20
            Once everything dries adequately, consider separating and gluing the joints. I cut a lot of hand-cut dovetails & similar fitment from small work up to timber framing dimensions on my projects and equipment here at my studio. cannot beat the better joint quality and I simply like to cut them. I never used glue until I finally learned from trial and error that the glue really is stronger than the wood. Once your PT wood dries adequately, consider fine tuning the joint fitment contact faces for better glue-up and then glue & clamp them. No matter how tight you bolt them, I would expect the vibration would work your dry joints to loosen them over time. Humidity variations will also be an enemy because end-grain handles moisture differently than side-grain. Once glued, the two piece of wood cannot move separately from each other and the grain is sealed so end- vs side-grain issues are resolved.

            Unless I plan to assemble/disassemble, I now glue all my joints. Just cannot let regular unused wood glue freeze or it will be junk.

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            • #21
              Thanks Cliff. I might just do that. I am hoping to spend more time on this project over the holidays.
              cheers Steve

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              • #22
                Still making progress here. Last week I got an old Ettco-Emrick threading machine for cheap. The foot pedal base and post will become the new stand for my planishing hammer. I'll set the rest aside for later. The post is the same diameter as my current assembly. Looks like I can reverse the pedal installation, even if I need to fabricate a new longer pedal, and have a good result. The action should be good. This actuation rod inside column between pedal and upper mechanism is positively located within the column by at least one set of casters, which would seem to both improves the action and minimizes deflection to keep the action in proper adjustment.

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                • #23
                  Looks good cliff, will be watching this for sure.
                  cheers
                  steve

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                  • #24
                    I took a few minutes to disassemble the machine so I can store the parts not being used. Whether use/modify this assembly or (more likely) make a close copy of it, I think this is a good idea. These are pics of the assembly with 4 caster wheels that locate the actuation rod from foot pedal to mechanism within the column. the axles float in a bronze casting with steel casters to eliminate deflection and provide a more accurate action. Clevis at bottom leads to pedal. Boss between the casters is for guide rod that went to the original threading head via a slot in the column.

                    For my planishing hammer use, I would need to extend a rod from the top end, opposite the clevis, beyond the top of the column in order to move the long rocker arm to run motor.


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                    Maybe this is a typical design and used on original 24" or 36" CP Planishing hammers (?).

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