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A HUGE thank you to Peter T!

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  • A HUGE thank you to Peter T!

    Woohoo! Look what arrived on Tuesday.

    it is a McPherson, same as Peter's. The previous owner bought it years ago and never used it, so recently he asked Peter if he knew of anyone looking for one. Peter was kind enough to send me an email and after a fairly convoluted process, it is now in my shed.

    The anvils with it have no bearings, but I am hoping that the Hoosier ones I bought sometime ago might fit; if not I can repair the originals.

    If anyone wants the frame of a fabricated wheel I made years ago let me know and we can negotiate,

    Cheers Charlie

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Wheel.jpg
Views:	172
Size:	2.21 MB
ID:	2398

  • #2
    Very, very cool. That's quite an addition to anybody's arsenal. I'm very happy that it's in your shop. Congratulations, Charley.

    Can you or Peter or anyone else add a little information & history about these English wheels. Not much about the McPherson in the Timothy Barton book and I know they are a significant inspiration for Peter's HandBuilt English Wheel. They were produced in AU, correct? Any idea of the production time frame or other info like how many versions, what happened with McPherson as a company/manufacturer, etc, ?

    Comment


    • #3
      That's a great score
      David Bradbury

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
        Very, very cool. That's quite an addition to anybody's arsenal. I'm very happy that it's in your shop. Congratulations, Charley.

        Can you or Peter or anyone else add a little information & history about these English wheels. Not much about the McPherson in the Timothy Barton book and I know they are a significant inspiration for Peter's HandBuilt English Wheel. They were produced in AU, correct? Any idea of the production time frame or other info like how many versions, what happened with McPherson as a company/manufacturer, etc, ?
        I remember going to a McPherson hardware store when I was about 19 (1979) in Perth; a few years later they were sold and I think became Atkins Carlisle; which later became Blackwood Atkins, which is now Blackwoods. Blackwoods still sell quality hardware. When McPherson's ceased making them I have no idea, if indeed it is the same company.

        I think the demise of Australian manufacturing began in the 1980's and time-consuming tasks such as wheeling, became old hat with the rise of after-market parts at affordable prices. It has become noticeably worse since car manufacturing ceased in Australia and the satellite companies had less contracts to bid for.

        Comment


        • #5
          I cleaned the wheel yesterday and checked the runout; 0.06mm on the wheel and 0,02mm on Joe's anvil.

          Unfortunately the previous owner sanded the wheel, probably to get rust off, and scratched it. I might have to take it off and sand it on the lathe, to get the scratches out; but if I do that I might upset the balance.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	Wheel runout.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.95 MB ID:	2439

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Chazza View Post
            Woohoo! Look what arrived on Tuesday.

            it is a McPherson, same as Peter's. The previous owner bought it years ago and never used it, so recently he asked Peter if he knew of anyone looking for one. Peter was kind enough to send me an email and after a fairly convoluted process, it is now in my shed.

            The anvils with it have no bearings, but I am hoping that the Hoosier ones I bought sometime ago might fit; if not I can repair the originals.

            If anyone wants the frame of a fabricated wheel I made years ago let me know and we can negotiate,

            Cheers Charlie

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Wheel.jpg
Views:	172
Size:	2.21 MB
ID:	2398


            Any time I can help please do not hesitate to ask ...and that goes for anybody in this forum as well . and while we are on the subject thank you all for joining
            Peter

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
              Very, very cool. That's quite an addition to anybody's arsenal. I'm very happy that it's in your shop. Congratulations, Charley.

              Can you or Peter or anyone else add a little information & history about these English wheels. Not much about the McPherson in the Timothy Barton book and I know they are a significant inspiration for Peter's HandBuilt English Wheel. They were produced in AU, correct? Any idea of the production time frame or other info like how many versions, what happened with McPherson as a company/manufacturer, etc, ?
              Ok this what I know about the Mc Pherson wheel

              It was built by ''Danks'' (a long time gone engineering shop in Melbourne ) it was distribute and sold all over OZ by Mc Pherson also in Melbourne. Now days Mc Pherson does not sell anything, they shut down in the 80's, BUT... I am told that they still owns the patterns for the casting, meaning that if you have $ 15000 AU you can still get one cast (no top wheel no lower anvils and no machining ) so I would hate to think what one would cost fully prepared for working now days Mc Pherson also sold swaging machines and other machinery made by a company called ''Justed'' also from Melbourne.

              The only thing I would like to say is that I have used many types of cast wheels in my time and they all where very good BUT the Mc Pherson wheel is just better and that is the reason why I used and model the handbuilt machine to it . I could have use other types of frames as a model, some Australian made or English built (which where imported way back then ), but I knew that the Mc Pherson was the perfect one . there is a Mc pherson in the US (believe or not ) and that is in Seattle area, I send it about 5/6 years ago when they where only about $4.500 AU . The time frame of the Mc Pherson wheel was cast about between 1950 and 1973 give and take a few years. One would really need to try a Mc Pherson to see and feel how good this machine really is ...if they where still around today you would get rid of what you are using in a flash
              Peter T.
              Ps I will check my notes about the wheel , (I have got them somewhere ) then I will edit any info or dates that could be wrong ?
              Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 01-15-2020, 10:50 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Chazza View Post
                I cleaned the wheel yesterday and checked the runout; 0.06mm on the wheel and 0,02mm on Joe's anvil.

                Unfortunately the previous owner sanded the wheel, probably to get rust off, and scratched it. I might have to take it off and sand it on the lathe, to get the scratches out; but if I do that I might upset the balance.

                Click image for larger version Name:	Wheel runout.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1.95 MB ID:	2439
                Chazza

                If you are going to do any work on the top wheel make sure to mark where the top wheel seats on taped shaft with a punch , or you could have more run out problems. If the taper on the shaft is worn out or damage ....? reshape the taper by machining , then fit the top wheel to it (anywhere ) then check the run out with the shaft and wheel as one assembly
                Peter

                Comment


                • Chazza
                  Chazza commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Thanks Peter, after using it on some practice pieces, I think I will leave it alone for now, as the metal finish is quite good, cheers Charlie

              • #9
                Originally posted by Peter Tommasini View Post

                Ok this what I know about the Mc Pherson wheel

                It was built by ''Danks'' (a long time gone engineering shop in Melbourne ) it was distribute and sold all over OZ by Mc Pherson also in Melbourne. Now days Mc Pherson does not sell anything, they shut down in the 80's, BUT... I am told that they still owns the patterns for the casting, meaning that if you have $ 15000 AU you can still get one cast (no top wheel no lower anvils and no machining ) so I would hate to think what one would cost fully prepared for working now days Mc Pherson also sold swaging machines and other machinery made by a company called ''Justed'' also from Melbourne.

                The only thing I would like to say is that I have used many types of cast wheels in my time and they all where very good BUT the Mc Pherson wheel is just better and that is the reason why I used and model the handbuilt machine to it . I could have use other types of frames as a model, some Australian made or English built (which where imported way back then ), but I knew that the Mc Pherson was the perfect one . there is a Mc pherson in the US (believe or not ) and that is in Seattle area, I send it about 5/6 years ago when they where only about $4.500 AU . The time frame of the Mc Pherson wheel was cast about between 1950 and 1973 give and take a few years. One would really need to try a Mc Pherson to see and feel how good this machine really is ...if they where still around today you would get rid of what you are using in a flash
                Peter T.
                Ps I will check my notes about the wheel , (I have got them somewhere ) then I will edit any info or dates that could be wrong ?
                So what I'm getting from this is that Charlie has officially achieved the coveted MIBTY (Mine Is Better Than Yours) status in the English Wheel world. Very cool!! Congratulations, Charlie.

                Comment


                • Chazza
                  Chazza commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Ha ha! What it needs, is for the owner to learn how to shape metal.
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