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My response to a hand fabricated wheeling machine on another site.

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  • #16
    I do like Peter's wheel and his big cast wheel, I don't use them for my stuff, (peter has demonstrated to me the correct method with panels I've taken up) I use my crappy wheel but the results are based on a Joe Andrew's upper wheel and some trued up lowers. slightly altered frame and altered cradle, it's more down to technique than frame quality. little pressure and technique rather than stiff frame and pressure (I listen to what he says). there is a sweet spot in the adjustment range on my frame, it's just after touching and a 1/4 turn, everything happens in that range. over that is too much pressure, under that is only for washover and straightening a reverse.

    money permitting I would get one of Peter's wheels today
    thanks neil

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    • #17
      using the blocking method with a pear shaped hammer I spoke about, walnuts on the wheel are basically all but gone, and the remains smooth out very quick
      thanks neil

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      • #18
        "little pressure and technique rather than stiff frame and pressure (I listen to what he says)." says it all for me! When Peter showed me this approach at Oblong, Illinois a few years ago, the light went on for me.

        For Cliff: At my level of experience, using the go cart tire in my fabricated frame works out quite well. When using the go cart tire, it has been my experience that the panel that I am working on is smooth to begin with and I am just trying to change the arrangement, and the air pressure will maintain the same pressure.


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        • #19
          Thanks, guys. I'm anxious to spend more time to learn proper use of my wheel. Pretty sure the tracking lines I'm often producing are indicative of too much pressure. The flex concerns related to fabricated frames that I have are as much related to my planishing frame build as any English wheel. I'm not wanting to assume they are equivalent.

          I feel pretty comfortable using Peter's blocking hammer. I like the mass. I don't have a pear shaped hammer yet, but I do have a pair of these nylon stone carving mallets https://tiranti.co.uk/product-catego...nylon-mallets/ that I keep thinking might be good for developing the appropriate shape. After more input about developing more open lower crown work entirely with the wheel, maybe not so much.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
            Thanks, guys. I'm anxious to spend more time to learn proper use of my wheel. Pretty sure the tracking lines I'm often producing are indicative of too much pressure. The flex concerns related to fabricated frames that I have are as much related to my planishing frame build as any English wheel. I'm not wanting to assume they are equivalent.

            I feel pretty comfortable using Peter's blocking hammer. I like the mass. I don't have a pear shaped hammer yet, but I do have a pair of these nylon stone carving mallets https://tiranti.co.uk/product-catego...nylon-mallets/ that I keep thinking might be good for developing the appropriate shape. After more input about developing more open lower crown work entirely with the wheel, maybe not so much.
            Hi Cliff ..are you after a pear shape wooden mallet ? If you are.... let me know we have new ones in stock

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Peter Tommasini View Post

              Hi Cliff ..are you after a pear shape wooden mallet ? If you are.... let me know we have new ones in stock
              Thanks, Peter. I have 1-2 heads already cut but not hung plus blanks to turn on my wod lathe to make some more.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by PhilT2 View Post
                Like many hobbyists I have a home made wheel and had my upper wheel and anvils machined locally. I have less than 1 thou runout on the upper and am unable to detect any movement in the frame at the low pressures I work at. All up cost $1000. Does it produce good results? No, but I suspect the true cause may be operator inexperience. I am interested in any opinions on what is acceptable runout and if the poor quality of anvils is the bigger problem with cheap wheels rather than the flexibility of the frame. The guy in the link has 10 thou runout but I have heard of 50 thou in some. But David Gardiner tested a Horror Freight wheel and seemed ok with it.
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nI_dgC5DuLw
                That is not David Gardiner on the video. Yes, he has a HF wheel, but he also has a Frost and an Edwards. With the other two to choose from, I'd venture he doesn't use the HF in making the SS100 wings. I did see where he used the HF in forming the radius for the corner of a petrol tank as the HF anvil matched the radius needed, which suggests he had a rubber tire or similar on the upper wheel. Rubber tires used for forming a radius don't require as much precision in their mating anvil like you would want with steel wheels in forming a compound shape.
                Last edited by MP&C; 11-10-2019, 06:14 AM.

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