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1967 Moto Guzzi V700 Corsa-Record

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Thanks, Pepe. Even though plans have changed, here's a little more to update the project. No matter, it was a worthy exercise and good practice.

    Did a little more with the wooden tach mock-up. Added elements on the back to represent what's there and realistic spacing requirements for the wiring. After that was done, I ebonized it for fun before adding a layer of polyurethane to seal it up for handling.

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    While this covid stuff stalls the world, I'm budgeting supplies towards paying stone work and putting off casual spending. Doing wood is fine. I've got quite a bit of mystery crating lumber, looks like oak, unbelievably hard and heavy. It came through the bike shop a while back and what wasn't used for a privacy fence came here.

    Last winter, I had scaled dimensions for the exhaust from a contemporary image. Since I have no formal slip roller, i decided I would glue up blanks to turn on the lathe to use as mandrels/hammerforms. After jointing and planing, two blanks were glued up- one for the initial taper and one for the reverse cone megaphone.

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    After initial squaring and trimming, the blank for the initial taper was installed in the lathe. No fancy lathe or accessories here, just me. For this project, I'm the taper attachment....

    I turned the piece to round, then marked the ends, then marked the mid point and again marked midpoints between those marks.

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    One at a time, I set a caliper to the appropriate diameter for each line, used a parting tool to produce that diameter and marked the line again with a pencil. The small end was cut to a straight 11/2" diameter to represent the headpipe.

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    Then the material between cut diameters was carefully removed to flush to produce the needed straight taper. This is the normal approach to doing accurate stone work. Not .0001+/- machinist perfect but certainly good enough for my project.

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    The same process was repeated on the other blank for the reverse cone megaphone.

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    To avoid drama, the ends were left a little heavy to be trimmed off after removal from the lathe.

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    The actual steel cones will end and meet at these two neighboring lines to be welded at an angle where the pipe sweeps upwards at the rear set foot pedal.

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    Pic of the original bike and exhaust-

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    The parts look better with the ends cleaned up and a little polyurethane to seal in the splinters & keep them clean while handling.

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    There's no new crs sheet metal here for these at present and probably won't be any until life & work comes back to some level of normal. For now, I may have some scrap sheet metal to practice and experiment with my planned homemade slip roll/bender fixture. These mandrels should be great to both shape and fine tune what I need to make.

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    Since I made this post over on the Guzzi site a few weeks ago, things here have changed. I added a long-sought metal lathe to my shop and am now trying to complete the transaction on a milling machine while my metal shop is still in rearrangement disarray. Basic materials to fabricate a simple slip roll are already here. Whether or not the milling machine happens now, a slip roll may now be built for these exhaust pieces.

    Edit # 2? June 21, 2020 Since I added the metal lathe, I've completed the equipping and reorganizing of my wood/model shop. To my metal shop, I've also added an Index Mill Model 40H (circa 1945) and a Pexto 0617 Bead Roller (1989) to go,with my lathe. Aside from moving my Gairu/Pullmax into my shop, this largley competes my equipment plans for the metal shop.

    Someday, doing actual Metalshaping work projects awaits....
    Last edited by cliffrod; 06-21-2020, 10:09 PM.

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  • pepe
    replied
    Woow this cafe racer project looks really cool

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  • cliffrod
    commented on 's reply
    Agreed.. I hadn't planned to do a mock-up for the tach but figured it might avert a bigger problem.
    It will be even better when I get finished with it. Apparently these tachometers weren't "special" when they were new. Now they're not easy to find.

    I have been planning for months to turn a mock-up/hammerform for the reverse cone megaphone muffler shell from oak. No slip roll here. Gluing up a blank to turn is on the short list. Pretty sure I scaled up those dimensions last fall. Now I just need to find them.

  • Chazza
    replied
    Mock ups can be so satisfying.😊

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Had a little more bike time today around clay model approval & work. I decided that before I drop the spare unobtainium tachometer while futzing with making & fitting a mount, I should mock-up a substitute. Started with a tin can that was conveniently the same diameter, cut it to length and added a pair of mounting studs to match the real tach.

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    Then I stepped over to the lathe to make a cap/bezel for this tin can. Figured I would make it long enough to slip it into the can a little and add a few screws. When I realized the handy scrap wood blank was big enough, it only took a few extra minutes to turn up an entire 1:1 scale duplicate oak tach. Should have just done that in the first place.... Now if things go wrong, this one will be lots cheaper to break.

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    I'll add the details on the back asap. Good to make some progress.

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Made a a little progress yesterday while waiting for approval from the current patron. Tried to snatch a pic of the new clip-ons from a website in Italy. But for some reason, it wasn't working... Hopefully they'll be back online after all this chaos settles down. So I got a pic of the same parts from a website in England.


    I had assembled a full set of older tommaselli clip ons and controls for the project, simply because I like them & it would match my V7 Sport. After enough studying old photos, the clip on pattern which I identified as most similar to the original bars used on the Record bikes are clip ons used on some Aermacchi race bikes. Given Tonti's prior experience with Aermacchi, that's probably not a coincidence. It appears the pattern is still available, so plans changed to order a set.

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    The perches on these clip ons route cables as parallel to the bars. The late 850GT perches had similar parallel cable routing. most loops, including my original V700 perches, have perches which angle cables back towards the handlebars. That won't work for this effort.. Since I only have one 850GT perch here, I had to make either something or wait until proper bars are finally in hand. I want to move forward with headlight ears and tach mount. So I made some parts to mock up and provide approximate cable orientation.

    Pretty simple. I've already got a pair of spare Magura clip ons on the bike for now. A little bit of scrap oak, some time on the bandsaw, then a gouge & some clean-up on the belt sander and I had a pair of perches.

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    I removed the V700 perches and tommaselli grips I had on the bike and installed these wooden perches with a couple of hose clamps. These perches have a drilled cup receiver and are slotted to potentially hold a cable. For now, a simple piece of smooth wire in each perch will suffice.

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    They look really big, but are surprisingly close to relevant maximum dimensions of the tommaselli matador perches. Didn't spend much time accurately scaling these parts from the photograph. I just estimated them. They should help a lot. Now it's time to get to work on a pair of headlight ears so I can make the tach mount.

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  • cliffrod
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks, Neil. Lots of talk about scrap metal, but I'm very happy with the relatively small amount of scrap wood on this effort. There's a couple of spots that don't capture specific transitions in the shape. I've thought about make solid inserts for those spots but probably won't at this point. Doing those areas in metal by eye should help it look more spontaneous like the originals.

    It looks great on the bike. Changing the shape (raising the front bottom corner 1 1/2" while leaving the rear bottom corner as is) helps the visual flow. When making the tank bottom parallel to the lower frame rail, I was studying pics and thinking too hard. It makes more sense that the rear of tank, where the petcocks are, would ride lower when installed...

    I'll take & post more pics but right now the shop is a wreck while I'm trying to get it into better shape.

  • neilb
    replied
    i really like the tank buck cliffy, and your approach to dialing it in with the shape. nice to see hand tools

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Had time to make lots of wood dust lately, sanding these buck stations into better agreement.



    The original tanks were likely very spontaneous, just made to hold enough fuel and fit the bike & rider as needed. No patterns or buck, just quick,work. This tank I'm building is deliberately trying to mimic that tank, so is a little more forced and determinant. Kinda like a trained artist trying to do child art. So I'm working from both the original pics and taking some guidance from other tanks. As noted before, this tank is smaller than the originals so that also changes things.

    The method of building this buck in halves, from the tank centerline outward, makes it very simple to develop the tunnel detail. Installed on bike at this point, it was too narrow and tight with these new stations. Remove 5 bolts, which secure in the opposite half with t-nuts, and all is readily accessed and modified as needed.





    Once the tunnel fit was resolved, I needed to add and develop the solid wood front corners of the tank. This buck isn't a hammerform so plain soft white wood 2x lumber is used for the corners. For the front, I needed to glue up thicker pieces. Once ready, contact sides were sanded to better fit the buck.



    The approx profile patterns is marked on two sides in pencil.





    Band saw is used to rough in corner along these profile patterns.



    The outer corner blank is still very heavy. I like power tools and could tilt the table on the bandsaw to trim here, but things go right or wrong more quickly with some cuts & methods. Just like stone, little pieces are little mistakes. So, once again I used my favorite cheap Irwin Japanese-style pull saw to go slower and carefully knock off these corners.







    The corners were screwed into place, before sanding finished the corners.





    With all in place and well-sanded, the stations are faired very well. It's easy to see the flow of the tank contours.





    At this point, I think this buck is finally finished. All needed now is to add a few light coats of polyurethane, both to protect the wood and keep it clean during the use when metalshaping. No big deal in terms of function but I want it to be clean.

    I would like to start on the metal work for the tank very soon, but doubt that will happen. I need more practice and prefer to do that on smaller items. I still need to address 1. the filler neck spigot for the cap I have yet to restore, 2. the petcock bungs and most importantly 3. proper baffles for this tank. Even if I further reduce tank capacity, baffles should be worth the effort.

    Next small project will be mocking up the cable mounts to guide development and fabrication of headlight ears and tachometer mount.

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  • cliffrod
    commented on 's reply
    Thanks, Charlie. I'm fine with different strokes for different folks- CAD just isn't what I want to do. I can't compete with the numeric accuracy that CAD and sophisticated modern equipment can facilitate. For projects like I do, it's not absolutely necessary. I'm excited by what is humanly possible with simple tools, two hands and practice. Making the physical shape helps me understand the goal better.

    I've been shaping wood longer than anything else. I love the way this plywood colors as it ages. Sure looks good as it goes from like yellow to all deep straw & honey.

  • Chazza
    replied
    Nice work Cliffy!

    I find there is a lot of satisfaction in mixing woodwork with metalwork.

    For myself, I don't think there would be any joy in receiving a buck in the post, that a machine had made for me.

    Good to see the progress on the bike,

    Cheers Charlie

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Did some work on the tank buck over the weekend. Finished one stone and had to do some model-related woodwork for the next one, so took advantage of being in the wood shop for a change.

    not to knock all the guys using CAD, waterjet, etc- To me, hand made means hand made. It's all practice. I like the challenge to cut a dozen equally tight and accurate joints in one piece of wood. I also like the challenge to not waste any more $$ plywood than necessary.

    When I made the buck using patterns pulled/lofted from the clay model, I pulled patterns for each side of the station location. Ideally, this would let me fair the stations closely before assembly so less work would be needed later. Like I said, it's all practice and practice is good for any craftsman. Some went a little past where I needed them to be and some ended up needing more work when I fixed the bottom profile as mentioned previously. Fixing the bottom also eliminated interference issues encountered with tank vs distributor. Some larger tanks have a large recess or false area to accommodate such things.

    Last Aug at the Redneck Roundup, I carefully used Jim Hery's OMG monster bandsaw to cut spacers for the base to locate stations like I had done along the center spine. It's a very simple way to make a tight dado and theoretically keep everything equally aligned. After modifying the bottom plate, I had cut new blanks for the stations later in the fall. Since then, it's all been waiting for time.

    Old buck stations along one side were removed. Pattern was transferred from each one to a new blank, with was then ganged to a partner with screws before being band sawed & belt sanded into general shape. This went quickly. Then each station was notched into the new base plate & cut to length. When all were done, spacers were added between the bases of each station. So far, just a single screw at each joint. They may be glued later. I still haven't unbolted the two halves (along the tank midline at top center) to add 1-2 screws to each station. Doing dadoes like this makes things so stable, I'm able to do al this work with stations simply well-fitted into those built-up dadoes. .

    When all was together, I began fairing the buck stations. Some excess was easily sawed away with either bandsaw or my favorite cheap Japanese pull saw. The rest of the blending was done with a 4" 40 grit flap wheel on a side grinder. I like to cut, not to grind or sand things into shape. With plywood, sanding is the necessary method. The ends of the stations are largely resolved. Here's the buck now, beside the removed stations and bottoms.


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    The stations are still a little tight in the tunnel area and don't fit as well over the frame mounting bushings I made. I also need to to blend the bottom inner corners when I have them removed. To resolve the tight tunnel, I can either remove each station or unbolt the halves to rework things as needed. Baffles, foam and decreasing tank volume are all being considered. Foam would be the easiest, but wonder about longevity and what it will do to carbs & beyond if and when it deteriorates. Input is welcome....

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    Aside from the glue in the plywood gumming up the sanding program, the top along center and bottom outer corners were all fairly quick and easy to blend or fair. I still need to fair the sides but ran out of shop time.

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    There's additonal shaping to do beyond fairing the sides. Still, the reworked buck looks good on the bike.

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    Building up a buck like this with spacers used to create dadoes for the stations is a very simple approach to doing a buck by hand. Computer modeled and waterjetted plywood parts are a more-guaranteed perfect fit, but not something most folks can do 100% in-house with few tools. At some point, my homemade & hand made buck can be fully glued together and be super solid.

    More to come, hopefully lots more before endlessly mowing grass around this place takes over for months on end..

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  • neilb
    replied
    progress is progress no matter how small

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    The last several weeks have been busy in studio, but shipped that job a week ago so I had a little time & $$$ to do bike stuff before the next stone arrives.

    I want to use Italian parts when I can. If not, I want to make parts that look Italian. I've had a crashed Ceriani 35mm top clamp or triple tree in the too-good-to-throw-away pile for years. I had plans to use the clamp portions from it as basis for headlight ears but decided on another path.

    Using card stock, I made a simple pattern for the ear.







    I transferred patterns to .125 thick 5000 series aluminum and cut them a little oversized, did some bending, welding, filing, sanding, etc and made a practice ear. This pic shows them bead blasted as I was trying to decide on the surface I wanted. In the end, I polished them.





    To attach these to the fork tubes and after studying some more, I settled upon the making clamps to mimic Dellorto carb clamps. Earlier ones, like on SS1 carbs, were aluminum and solid. Later ones, apparently around the time of the V7 Sport, are a folded piece of steel. I decided the folded design would be the best choice to weld to the ear. NOS Dellorto bolts & nuts were ordered. A pattern was made. Using a 35mm knockout punch, I punched two holes and drilled a third smaller hole between these holes. Folding them accurately is not too hard but I'm still working on doing it better to avoid stressing the bend. After everything was bent and trimmed for the nut & bolt, a slot was cut to make the clamp functional.

    love a knockout punch-



    The hole fits the hammered sportster fork tube perfectly- very cool.



    Now making the clamps-











    Not knowing how the welding would go, I made one clamp slightly wider than the other one.



    Today I went to town to restock welding supplies. Back at the shop, I decided to try welding everything together. Didn't get pics of the TIG welding and grinding, but my welding is getting better. I used a scrap 35mm sportster tube to align the clamps. Lots of trimming, then welding and more filing, grinding & polishing and I have a practice headlight ear.











    I still need to install this on my bike, mark & drill the hole to mount the headlight. I'm using the long headlight on this bike to help house any electrical components are needed. Need to make a few adjustments, but this ear will work well to develop a proper pattern.

    Between pending projects and the holidays, it will probably be awhile before much gets done. No matter- it feels good to make some progress.

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Full update copy & paste from WIldGuzzi thread,,with a little repeat stuff because y'all get preview updates along the way..

    At this point, I've decided I will be making a new seat and rear fender after using the ones in hand for all fitment and experimentation. My welding is improving and there's no reason to try to make these pieces perfect. It will be faster to make good ones and hang these up as souvenirs.


    Saying I've wanted to build a bike around one of these CEV taillights for years isn't far from the truth. Among others, these lights came on Ducati 175 & 200 Elite models in the late 50's and very early 60's. imho, it's a perfect fit to incoprporate into a typical cafe racer seat. I had already trimmed off the back of my first seat, so now it was time to weld in a basic mounting platform.

    This lamp assembly uses two ancient 6v bullet-ended bulbs. I'm still sorting out the details about the lamp upgrade. Saw some similar sized LED bullet ended builds that might work or may just use a regular or LED 1157. Until I get all in place with fender, I'm waiting on developing the lamp interior.

    So I made a pattern to fit the hump, turned a simple flange to facilitate welding and welded it in place. Only blew one hole this time and then quickly fixed it.





    Looks ok on the bike. Should be able to center the next one even better.



    After the taillight was mounted, I started working on mounting and initial trimming of the rear fender. After studying enough pics, I understood the front mount was a pair of small L brackets that rivet to the fender. Before making them, I added a lateral bead across the leading end to both clear the frame cross member below the battery tray and to stiffen the fender. Not sure that it's necessary to have the fender this long, but it's easier to cut it off later than to add it...



    After bead was added (with simple hammer & stump/dolly work), the fender was marked and trimmed to length.





    The L brackets were pretty simple to make from 16g crs. After a pair were bent, I had to mark & drill holes to attach these via the two bolts at the rear of the battery tray.





    Transferring holes can be done with a cross made from two pieces of tape. At the intersection, the sticky sides face each other. Use one layer of tape to tape it to the piece with the hole. Mark the hole as you like. Place the part to receive the pattern in place. Use the other sticky face to attach the pattern to the receiving part & remove the tape from the original part. Make your hole.





    After that, I marked holes for the fender rivets before drilling the bracket & then the fender. For now, I'll use small bolts instead of rivets. Not sure if I'll make new brackets for the new fender.later or reuse these.



    With the front mounts done, I moved to the rear of the fender. Before trimming it to initial length, I wanted to add a narrow bead across the end. This will stiffen the fender and is similar to the bead found on the trailing edge of a V7 Sport fender. For this one, I simply freehand end a bead with a cross pein hammer using another cross pein hammer held in the vise as a dolly. It isn't perfect, but wasn't meant to be. It was fast & easy and looks good.





    After the bead was done, I marked the fender and trimmed it to length. I thought it looked good but Tip wasn't impressed.



    Test mounting the fender and seat on bike looked good, even with the frame loop intact.





    I left the fender slightly longer than the height of a handy license plate. The angle isn't very vertical, but should be manageable. Cannot really deal with this until the frame is cut because the frame is in the way.





    Now was time to add a vertical loop for mounting the seat & rear fender and to tie the frame together after the rear loop was cut. No handy channel in my scrap inventory. so I welded two equal lengths of 1/2" angle into a channel, made a pair of pie cuts at the bends & welded it up, fish-mouthed the ends to fit the frame, ground everything clean and welded it to the frame.



    Then made a couple of cuts and removed the rear frame loop.



    Now the seat and fender look much better-









    I did make it to both shows, including the nearby Tryon (NC) Rolling Art car, truck and bike show. I first displayed the bike here last year, so wanted to have some progress to show. Saw several old friends, made some new ones and had a great time.



    Yesterday and today, I had time to resolve the fork brace. The original Record bikes simply utilized a lower or rear font fender brace turned vertical and attached at the upper fender mounts via two small tab brackets. Very simple, probably not incredibly effective but that's what they did so that's what I'm doing. First I had to relieve the stamped end to clear the weld at the bottom of the fork slider.



    After removing two broken fender mounting bolts from the fork lowers, I made a quick pattern from card stock and transferred it to some handy 14? gauge crs. Ganged the pieces together to sand them to even shape, then drilled and countersunk holes.







    Some simple bending to match parts was followed by lots of trial fitting. Once all fit well, all was cleaned to prep for brazing. Brazed area was then cleaned, masked and spray painted black like the original Record bikes.





    Fits well and looks good- very cool...

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