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1967 Moto Guzzi V700 Corsa-Record

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  • #46
    i really like the tank buck cliffy, and your approach to dialing it in with the shape. nice to see hand tools
    thanks neil

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    • cliffrod
      cliffrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks, Neil. Lots of talk about scrap metal, but I'm very happy with the relatively small amount of scrap wood on this effort. There's a couple of spots that don't capture specific transitions in the shape. I've thought about make solid inserts for those spots but probably won't at this point. Doing those areas in metal by eye should help it look more spontaneous like the originals.

      It looks great on the bike. Changing the shape (raising the front bottom corner 1 1/2" while leaving the rear bottom corner as is) helps the visual flow. When making the tank bottom parallel to the lower frame rail, I was studying pics and thinking too hard. It makes more sense that the rear of tank, where the petcocks are, would ride lower when installed...

      I'll take & post more pics but right now the shop is a wreck while I'm trying to get it into better shape.

  • #47
    Made a a little progress yesterday while waiting for approval from the current patron. Tried to snatch a pic of the new clip-ons from a website in Italy. But for some reason, it wasn't working... Hopefully they'll be back online after all this chaos settles down. So I got a pic of the same parts from a website in England.


    I had assembled a full set of older tommaselli clip ons and controls for the project, simply because I like them & it would match my V7 Sport. After enough studying old photos, the clip on pattern which I identified as most similar to the original bars used on the Record bikes are clip ons used on some Aermacchi race bikes. Given Tonti's prior experience with Aermacchi, that's probably not a coincidence. It appears the pattern is still available, so plans changed to order a set.

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    The perches on these clip ons route cables as parallel to the bars. The late 850GT perches had similar parallel cable routing. most loops, including my original V700 perches, have perches which angle cables back towards the handlebars. That won't work for this effort.. Since I only have one 850GT perch here, I had to make either something or wait until proper bars are finally in hand. I want to move forward with headlight ears and tach mount. So I made some parts to mock up and provide approximate cable orientation.

    Pretty simple. I've already got a pair of spare Magura clip ons on the bike for now. A little bit of scrap oak, some time on the bandsaw, then a gouge & some clean-up on the belt sander and I had a pair of perches.

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    I removed the V700 perches and tommaselli grips I had on the bike and installed these wooden perches with a couple of hose clamps. These perches have a drilled cup receiver and are slotted to potentially hold a cable. For now, a simple piece of smooth wire in each perch will suffice.

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    They look really big, but are surprisingly close to relevant maximum dimensions of the tommaselli matador perches. Didn't spend much time accurately scaling these parts from the photograph. I just estimated them. They should help a lot. Now it's time to get to work on a pair of headlight ears so I can make the tach mount.

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    • #48
      Had a little more bike time today around clay model approval & work. I decided that before I drop the spare unobtainium tachometer while futzing with making & fitting a mount, I should mock-up a substitute. Started with a tin can that was conveniently the same diameter, cut it to length and added a pair of mounting studs to match the real tach.

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      Then I stepped over to the lathe to make a cap/bezel for this tin can. Figured I would make it long enough to slip it into the can a little and add a few screws. When I realized the handy scrap wood blank was big enough, it only took a few extra minutes to turn up an entire 1:1 scale duplicate oak tach. Should have just done that in the first place.... Now if things go wrong, this one will be lots cheaper to break.

      >

      I'll add the details on the back asap. Good to make some progress.

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      • #49
        Mock ups can be so satisfying.😊

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        • cliffrod
          cliffrod commented
          Editing a comment
          Agreed.. I hadn't planned to do a mock-up for the tach but figured it might avert a bigger problem.
          It will be even better when I get finished with it. Apparently these tachometers weren't "special" when they were new. Now they're not easy to find.

          I have been planning for months to turn a mock-up/hammerform for the reverse cone megaphone muffler shell from oak. No slip roll here. Gluing up a blank to turn is on the short list. Pretty sure I scaled up those dimensions last fall. Now I just need to find them.

      • #50
        Woow this cafe racer project looks really cool

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        • #51
          Thanks, Pepe. Even though plans have changed, here's a little more to update the project. No matter, it was a worthy exercise and good practice.

          Did a little more with the wooden tach mock-up. Added elements on the back to represent what's there and realistic spacing requirements for the wiring. After that was done, I ebonized it for fun before adding a layer of polyurethane to seal it up for handling.

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          While this covid stuff stalls the world, I'm budgeting supplies towards paying stone work and putting off casual spending. Doing wood is fine. I've got quite a bit of mystery crating lumber, looks like oak, unbelievably hard and heavy. It came through the bike shop a while back and what wasn't used for a privacy fence came here.

          Last winter, I had scaled dimensions for the exhaust from a contemporary image. Since I have no formal slip roller, i decided I would glue up blanks to turn on the lathe to use as mandrels/hammerforms. After jointing and planing, two blanks were glued up- one for the initial taper and one for the reverse cone megaphone.

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          After initial squaring and trimming, the blank for the initial taper was installed in the lathe. No fancy lathe or accessories here, just me. For this project, I'm the taper attachment....

          I turned the piece to round, then marked the ends, then marked the mid point and again marked midpoints between those marks.

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          One at a time, I set a caliper to the appropriate diameter for each line, used a parting tool to produce that diameter and marked the line again with a pencil. The small end was cut to a straight 11/2" diameter to represent the headpipe.

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          Then the material between cut diameters was carefully removed to flush to produce the needed straight taper. This is the normal approach to doing accurate stone work. Not .0001+/- machinist perfect but certainly good enough for my project.

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          The same process was repeated on the other blank for the reverse cone megaphone.

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          To avoid drama, the ends were left a little heavy to be trimmed off after removal from the lathe.

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          The actual steel cones will end and meet at these two neighboring lines to be welded at an angle where the pipe sweeps upwards at the rear set foot pedal.

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          Pic of the original bike and exhaust-

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          The parts look better with the ends cleaned up and a little polyurethane to seal in the splinters & keep them clean while handling.

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          There's no new crs sheet metal here for these at present and probably won't be any until life & work comes back to some level of normal. For now, I may have some scrap sheet metal to practice and experiment with my planned homemade slip roll/bender fixture. These mandrels should be great to both shape and fine tune what I need to make.

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          Since I made this post over on the Guzzi site a few weeks ago, things here have changed. I added a long-sought metal lathe to my shop and am now trying to complete the transaction on a milling machine while my metal shop is still in rearrangement disarray. Basic materials to fabricate a simple slip roll are already here. Whether or not the milling machine happens now, a slip roll may now be built for these exhaust pieces.

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