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Wheeling machine - excercises: General information

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  • Wheeling machine - excercises: General information

    In this topic describes the General Information that is used in the wheeling exercises that will I will post here at a later stage.

    General Information: (this is what I understood, and was learned when one use a wheeling machine to shape panels and may not to be in line with what others think, so bear with me)

    Wheeling = hammering
    The wheeling machine should be considered not as a rolling machine that forms over rollers, but as a machine that strikes many hammer blows after each other on the path that is being rolled. So one should only wheel where one would want a to strike the panel. If one would be able to strike a hammer with the same constant tension/blow strength and the same thigh path as a wheeling machine, it would give the same result. That being said: this is more a form a concept as one would not be able to deliver this in real world).
    Wheeling is used to shape the panel. All shaping that is stretching, can be done on the wheeling machine. The wheeling machine can not shrink.

    Tension:
    The wheeling machine works with two wheels (anvils) that "strike" the panel while it is being passed through the wheels. The tension of these to the panel is the force of the strike. The advice is given to use only three levels of tension of possible and not bring up the tension in order to get a faster result.
    Tension 1: Wash-over tension: this is a low tension where one cannot slide the panel sideways on itself, and this is used to relief the panel from tension without altering the shape. See this as getting the panel even and without tension.
    Tension 2: Middle tension: this is tension that is above tension 1, and it will form a panel.
    Tension 3: High tension: this tension is only a few degrees above the middle tension.

    Bottom anvils:
    the bottom anvils "declare" the maximum of curvature/crown that can be rolled. ALWAYS use the most flat anvil that will fit the shape of the panel. If the anvil is/become to flat, one can see this as this will though the panel with the sides of the anvil, leaving traces that one does not want. Then one needs to exchange the anvil for a more radiused anvil. (But one should avoid this situation by checking shape the radius at an earlier stage)

    Tracking patterns:
    As a panel is fed through the anvils/wheels of a wheeling machine, it "strikes" where the contact between the anvils and the panel is. In order to get a smooth panel one should work with consistency in pressure and in motion/tracking of the panel.

    Standard tracking pattern:
    A panel is placed into the wheeling machine, and is then rolled forward, just stopping from the end of the panel (2cm /1") and then the panel is moved in the opposite way while the panel is angled slightly sideways, resulting in a return path that slightly shifts to one side, near the end the panel is stopped, angled again slightly sideways and is pushed forward. This results in a M-shaped track. If this is repeated it the track will be like to following drawing:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Standard track first pass.png Views:	0 Size:	7.8 KB ID:	1905
    Now turn the panel 90 degrees and repeating the above will cross track the panel resulting in the following (where the red track is the new track:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	Standard track second pass.png Views:	0 Size:	36.4 KB ID:	1906
    Staggered tracking pattern:
    A panel is placed into the wheeling machine, and is then rolled forward, just stopping from the end of the panel (2cm /1") and then the panel is moved in the opposite way while the panel is angled slightly sideways, resulting in a return path that slightly shifts to one side, stopping not at the end, but over the middle the panel is stopped, angled again slightly sideways and is pushed forward just over the middle of the panel, and then revers near the end of the panel. The results are a long-short-short-long track/motion. If this is repeated it the track will be like to following drawing:

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Stagered track.png Views:	0 Size:	12.8 KB ID:	1907
    Why different tracking patterns?
    There where the tracks overlap and/or are close together, there were more "strikes" and there for the metal is more stretched at that point than at the other points of the track.. With a staggered pattern, the middle part is stretched more than the edges as one places more strikes onto the middle part.

    Wash-Out pass:
    A wash out pass is always done at light pressure and is to be used to relief a panel from tension without altering the shape, therefore only light pressure is to be used in a standard pattern followed with a cross standard pattern.

    Panel preparation:
    1) Deburr: Always make sure that the panel is deburred before it is handled in a wheeling machine
    2) Clean panel: Make a habit of cleaning the panel by whipping it with thinners before on start working, or when one resume working on a panel after each break.
    3) Clean wheels: Make a habit of cleaning the wheels by wiping it with thinners before on start working, or when one resume working on a panel after each break. Dirt on the wheels can and will otherwise be transferred onto and worked into the panel. Depending on the dirt, it can also damage or mark the wheels. It is also good practice to wipe the top wheel when it is looks dull/less shining as that can be an indicator that the top wheel is getting dirty from wheeling the panel.
    4) Do a Wahs-over cross pattern to releef the panel from any tension.

    What material to use when wheeling?
    OK, I can only repeat what was told to me, and this will not be absolute information for everyone.

    Aluminium:
    Half hard 1.2 or 1.5mm aluminium (English code is 1050A HA14, but we found out that HA24 is a bit harder but also works) has the characteristics to shape with ease. It does not to be annealed prior to wheeling. When one want to hammer real tight corners, than annealing is desired.

    Metal:
    Cold Rolled CR1 or CR4 is the preferred choices, where CR1 is preferred as it is less hard to work with preferred but harder to get your hands on.

    BS (UK) DIN (Germany) European Standard
    CR1 St14 DC04
    CR4 St12 DC01
    (*if anyone has other standards representing CR1 and CR4 equivalents, please share them with me and I'll add them here).
    Last edited by johnmar; 10-20-2019, 01:44 PM.
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