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Working alone, wheeling, and large panels

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  • Working alone, wheeling, and large panels

    I am in the process of restoring a Datsun/Nissan 240Z. I talked about it some in the "Jig" thread I started. I ultimately decided not to restore that car as it was just too far gone. I have another 1971 that is a rolling shell (with a title though) that I am going to restore in it's place using much of the components from the rust bucket '71. My goal is to have something to Show and get my name out there to generate some business for myself.

    Anyways it's going to need some replacement panels and I would like to generate some income to supplement things as I'm doing by making some panels for the Nissan S30 (Z Car) that are NLA or not reproduced and sell them online. So here are my issues. I have no one that I can get to help me wheel. Even if I could get someone my skill level and understanding is just barely above novice level (you did tell me Peter that I was a good partner in wheeling that trunk skin at Mike Phillips Shop.....that made me feel good) so trying to tell the other guy what to do and me doing it correctly seems insurmountable to me. But like I said in my area there really aren't any guys I could get to do it.

    There are a couple of large panels that I'd like to make that I feel are impossible for me to do unless I make them in two pieces and weld. Complete roof skins, and 1/4 panels are the two that I'm struggling trying to figure out how to do it on my own. My question is (finally...... I know I ramble) how do I approach doing real panels when help is nonexistent and I have to do it on my own. I know Peter that you said once about 40"x35" is the max that you can do. Still learning, I find it a challenge to do panels not even that large and still control it and be able to concentrate on tracking and understanding what I'm doing. Kent White has told me the answer to larger panels by yourself is the power hammer. Peter do you feel that is the case? I'm trying to do very high quality but I also would like to be able to do stuff within a reasonable amount of time so that I can make a little income. Would it be a cardinal sin splitting a complete roof skin (not a patch) down the middle and welding it (gas)? Have you been in the situation where you did not have help and had to do panels larger than what you could handle Peter? How did you approach it? Anyone else obviously feel free to join in as well. Thanks.
    Last edited by Chris_Hamilton; 02-12-20, 03:47 AM.

  • #2
    chris any chance of a pic of the 1/4 panel in question?
    thanks neil

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
      I am in the process of restoring a Datsun/Nissan 240Z. I talked about it some in the "Jig" thread I started. I ultimately decided not to restore that car as it was just too far gone. I have another 1971 that is a rolling shell (with a title though) that I am going to restore in it's place using much of the components from the rust bucket '71. My goal is to have something to Show and get my name out there to generate some business for myself.

      Anyways it's going to need some replacement panels and I would like to generate some income to supplement things as I'm doing by making some panels for the Nissan S30 (Z Car) that are NLA or not reproduced and sell them online. So here are my issues. I have no one that I can get to help me wheel. Even if I could get someone my skill level and understanding is just barely above novice level (you did tell me Peter that I was a good partner in wheeling that trunk skin at Mike Phillips Shop.....that made me feel good) so trying to tell the other guy what to do and me doing it correctly seems insurmountable to me. But like I said in my area there really aren't any guys I could get to do it.

      There are a couple of large panels that I'd like to make that I feel are impossible for me to do unless I make them in two pieces and weld. Complete roof skins, and 1/4 panels are the two that I'm struggling trying to figure out how to do it on my own. My question is (finally...... I know I ramble) how do I approach doing real panels when help is nonexistent and I have to do it on my own. I know Peter that you said once about 40"x35" is the max that you can do. Still learning, I find it a challenge to do panels not even that large and still control it and be able to concentrate on tracking and understanding what I'm doing. Kent White has told me the answer to larger panels by yourself is the power hammer. Peter do you feel that is the case? I'm trying to do very high quality but I also would like to be able to do stuff within a reasonable amount of time so that I can make a little income. Would it be a cardinal sin splitting a complete roof skin (not a patch) down the middle and welding it (gas)? Have you been in the situation where you did not have help and had to do panels larger than what you could handle Peter? How did you approach it? Anyone else obviously feel free to join in as well. Thanks.


      Chris.....
      That is the reason why I design my planishing hammer with BIG dies , a large panel is well supported and I can do it on my own, having said that ...a large panel can still be be a bit of a straggle, BUT.... it's better than making in a many pieces. But also, keep well in mind that sometime making a large panel in a few pieces ...... (depending on the shape ??) Is not a bad idea at all.
      The Monaro quarter for example , was a big blank ..(about 8x4 feet )...that was wheeled up with a helper , ...but the last large panel that I have made was off a Capri and that was about 6x4 feet , and that was done on the hammer .So what I am trying to say is that no mater whether a large panel is made in one piece or a few ..at the end of the day it's a matter of cost and whether you need some help , or..... if possible to do it by your self,..... if a large panel at the end is right, ... well .. it really does not matter.
      Peter T.

      PS........
      The reason why the Monaro quarter was done in one piece was the fact that because of it's large return (on the wheel arch ) and the blending of the rest of it shapes, it would have been a nightmare to weld it and planish anywhere on the panel, or.... it would have taking too long to make the pieces and try to weld them successfully. + I am not afraid of a challenge .
      Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 02-12-20, 11:44 AM.

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      • #4
        Peter Tommasini Peter I sent you an E-Mail inquiring about the PH conversion for your wheel. Thanks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
          Peter Tommasini Peter I sent you an E-Mail inquiring about the PH conversion for your wheel. Thanks.
          Hi Chris,.... I have sent you a E mail
          Peter T.

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          • #6
            Looking at the construction of a lot of the hand built cars from the 50s and 60s many of those roofs are broken into left and right sides, front and back then a center section.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	20201124_123702.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	1.09 MB
ID:	4746 here you can see the right side attached to the center of the roof. Middle left of the pic you can see the roof center over lapping the center rear of the roof. The roof you are talking about would be similar in size. Trimming, tacking, fusion welding, and metal finishing are about 30hrs.
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              Chris, stop by if you want to try out the Powell hammer..

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