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Measuring Large Profiles

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  • Moving molecules .
    replied
    Just ordered a Half length Set from Justin Baker in U.K. £279. 😉 was Trade though . Will order a full set soon.
    Last edited by Moving molecules .; 03-18-2020, 06:34 PM.

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Buying a set of sweeps is a no-brainer. Most here know about them and certainly consider them to be an ideal solution to take advantage of if given a viable opportunity. But like Neil said, it's a large expense for an individual if this work does not produce income.

    i keep a set of standard patterns (roughly equivalent to sweeps, but not as expensive) for stonework here at the studio.

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    Some different patterns are assemblies of these patterns,in whole or part. Others are completely unique, so have to be made as described. Those are labeled well and added to the collection, just in case they're ever needed again. As a professional, they're necessary. For those doing it otherwise, they rarely have a regular set.

    Mike Phillips did a group buy deal 1-2 yrs ago for a CNC-cut full set of long & short sweeps. Looked for the ad over on AMS, thought price was around $650 but maybe less. I considered a set but end up not buying this time. Even at that price, he had trouble getting orders from that large forum. He said it was a huge effort on his part re: organizing sets once cut, shipping and getting all issues resolved without making any profit. As a result, he said he would never do it again.

    edit- found the ad. Didn't see a price but Peter commented it was about a third of what costs would be in AU. Looks like he had orders for 35 sets from elsewhere plus possibly 2 from AMS members. He told us about the whole adventure at the RR at Jim's last summer. the cut sweeps came to him as-cut in a large pile & it was a giant PIA to organize sets of 100 pieces each to service orders.
    Last edited by cliffrod; 03-18-2020, 06:46 PM. Reason: Correction

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  • sparky
    replied
    Wow those sweep sets are expensive! But a must have when your in business as a professional I suppose.

    It looks like the best for me will be either the strips of metal shaped to what ever i'm trying to duplicate or the board and bondo method which seems super accurate and quick.

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  • neilb
    replied
    peter sells the sweep sets too, they are really handy and i would love a set, but using the method i do i can create an ever deceasing or increasing radii, panels very rarely need 1 sweep, i've seen peter have 2 sweeps clamped together to follow a curve. it's much quicker to do that than make a sweep just for 1 curve. unfortunately i don't get paid for doing my work. if i was, i would clamp 2 sweeps together

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  • Moving molecules .
    replied
    Justin Baker here in U.K. sale them , Fay Butler in US . There could be a chart online , so you can CNC them.

    cheers Matt

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    Last edited by Moving molecules .; 03-18-2020, 07:16 AM.

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  • neilb
    commented on 's reply
    any detail swage lines in the panel out come the contour gauges, i have a few of them, some masking tape on them and number them reference to the panel placement

  • sparky
    replied
    Mike how do you measure & make your own large sweeps?

    I see in a lot of pictures of the professional panel beater shops online, all the automotive sweeps on a cart. But what I'm talking about are the profiles you have to make to replicate a panel with many critical body lines and returns. In Peter's DVD's # 7,8,9 he showed some the template profiles (And stated that there were many more that he wasn't showing) he used to make the quarter for the Monaro. I was wondering what people here did to make them. So far there is metal strips stretched/ Shrink, and plastic corrugated board with bondo filler on the end. Both are better than what I was trying to do.

    Chris

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  • Chazza
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, that is the method.

    The template and the panel/shape need reference marks on them, so that they are always checked in exactly the same place in relation to each other.

    The first project I ever did like this, was a marking-out template for a mudguard I was making. The template has all of the fastening hole locations marked on it, with 1mm holes. When it is clamped to the panel the hole locations can be pilot-drilled or sprayed.

    All of the skills were learnt from Peter's DVD's!

    As Cliffy would say: "Very cool!"

  • Moving molecules .
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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  • Moving molecules .
    replied
    Gents, when you have rebuilt an entire car you start to think and feel like the draughtsman who uses technical drawing tools and engineering sweeps to design the car .Also what I found interesting when l was making the Aston Martin panels is all the folds on the panels matched the period FJ Edwards box&pan folder.
    So for big panels on bonnets etc get yourself some automotive sweeps or make some. hope Peter T will agree with me .

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  • Blue62
    replied
    Sparky,
    I used to do it that way but for me it took to much time.
    So I went to the plywood bondo method. Much faster and easier for me to do.

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  • sparky
    replied
    Ok I just gave the sheet metal profile a go. I did a little one to start, just to get the feel of it. I stretched one side, test fit, back and forth, then a little grinding to get over the body line. It took me about 40 minutes to make, but I’m a novice so factor that in. Obviously this little piece could have been made with a profile gauge much quicker, but I want to practice the technique.

    next up I’m trying the Bondo technique.

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  • cliffrod
    commented on 's reply
    spanked by Charlie again... nicely played! I probably should do this as well and will give it a try for more subtle transitions in shape.

  • sparky
    replied
    Thanks for the ideas guys. I'm gonna give both a try and see what one is best for me.


    Chazza & neilb

    On the metal profile template: what is the process of making it? I understand the stretching and shrinking part, but do you hold it up to the body panel, see where it needs to be stretched/ shrinked, bring it to the stake anvil and hammer it, bring it back to the body panel to test fit, and do this over and over till it is right?

    Thanks again,
    Chris

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  • Blue62
    replied
    I do similar to Bill Tromblay.
    I use thin scrap plywood. I get it close to the profile with my bandsaw then bondo the edge. I use 1/2 inch masking tape over the area I am pulling the profile from.
    Then press the roughed out plywood with bonded edge onto the masking taped area. Let it setup good. It always comes off easy and makes very good profiles.
    I think Bill's method may be better as you can cut the corrugated sign stock with scissors. Easier and faster then the plywood method

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