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Measuring Large Profiles

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  • neilb
    replied
    i do the same as charlie, strip of metal or aluminium, use the shrinker/stretcher to create the curve

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  • Chazza
    replied
    I have made a profile from a 20mm x 1.2mm wide piece of gal steel. I stretched one edge on the anvil and used a cross-pein woodwork hammer, to do the stretching.

    The woodwork hammer is much faster than a stretching hammer and marks on the surface don't matter, because only the profile matters. If it gets stretched too far, then the opposite side can be stretched to bring it back.

    The profile can also be filed to shape and the template is durable and doesn't rust,

    Cheers Charlie

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  • sparky
    replied
    Thanks Cliffrod, I just went down the waste of time, materials, and a lot of no good patterns pathway. 🤦‍♂️

    as you pointed out the scribe got close but to many inconsistencies due to how I hold and moved it to be right on. That Bondo idea and plastic corrugated sheet sounds like a great idea and precise.

    ill wait till others chime in to see what other options there are. Some of the things that seem like they should be easy can really be frustrating.

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  • cliffrod
    replied
    Bill Tromblay may post more about his method to use corrugated plastic (as used for yard signs), trimmed closely to the desired profile. After using a release agent like plastic wrap and/wax on the original surface being patterned, He then generously covers and packs the edge of the trimmed plastic with bondo and presses & holds it against the original surface. Once hardened, it makes a very accurate pattern. I haven't done it yet but it sounds great.

    me- I was trained (in stone work) to use card stock, trimming smaller pieces to a very good fit, then overlapping and securely attaching each piece to the next until I have a full pattern. ​​​Mounting a solid armature (board or similar) close to the profile being measured to attach these piece to helps keep the pattern in proper shape. I like to have a straight edge to help index all the pieces during the process. Depending upon the job, I'll transfer this assembled pattern information to stiff plastic or sheet metal and make a durable pattern. I'll attach some finished patterns to a piece of board when needed to stiffen it for use, usually mimicking the card stock & board arrangement. Label the specifics about your pattern on the pattern and add it to the pattern inventory, just in case...

    The drafting compass and scribe method- if I'm thinking of the same thing you are- is good for approximating but not very precise. Any inconsistencies in how you hold and move the tools will compromise the results. It's an easy way to make a lot of no-good patterns, wasting time, money and materials.. Sometimes you can cut up the sections that fit well, attach to each as described above but it's a crap shoot for most people.

    Theres lots of of ways to make patterns, from smart to laughable. The way I do it is how I was trained because it's fast, cheap and effective. Bill's method is the only other method I've seen that makes professional sense.

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  • sparky
    started a topic Measuring Large Profiles

    Measuring Large Profiles

    Hi folks,

    A novice question here. After watching Peters DVD course I see the importance of measuring panel profiles and making templates.

    I need to make a profile template of a door skin that is that is 24inches (610mm) tall. I have a 6inch (150mm) profile gauge. I figure either I need to take multiple measurements with the profile gauge, find a longer one, or possibly use a drafting compass and scribe the profile on the template.

    what is the best way to measure and make a long profile template?

    chris
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