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Tipping an edge on a guard

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  • Tipping an edge on a guard

    Hi All,
    I have been kicking this around for awhile, and am interested in your thoughts.
    I have an old motorcycle guard I would like to copy. It is pretty basic and I think I can duplicate most of it but I am looking for ideas how to form the outside lip
    There is no beading or wiring and the material is fairly thick steel about 1.5 mil.
    Was thinking perhaps using a tipping wheel to set the transition from the curved part of the guard. And maybe using a tipping stick (bar with a slot cut in it) and maybe setting tucks and then hammering them out?

    Thanks Steve
    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    basically steve, yes that's how i would have a go at it, i don't think i would use a tipping die, i think i would just mark a line where it needs tipping and tip it with basic hand tools shrinking as you go along. if you have a little extra material on the edges you can use a shrinker (lancaster type) and then trim off the area with the marks on.
    thanks neil

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    • #3
      Originally posted by neilb View Post
      basically steve, yes that's how i would have a go at it, i don't think i would use a tipping die, i think i would just mark a line where it needs tipping and tip it with basic hand tools shrinking as you go along. if you have a little extra material on the edges you can use a shrinker (lancaster type) and then trim off the area with the marks on.
      Yes that is right Neil , that is one good way..
      Steve ......you can also make the guard first then use a small blocking hammer and block all around the marked line where the edge needs to come over, that will make the edge starting to come around, then shrink the edge as you go, planish the small blocking hammer walnuts and create the radius line (looks like a radius line ?) then with a coking tool clean up the radius to suit on a sand bag
      Peter T.

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      • #4
        Steve,

        I just did the aluminum fender for my Guzzi with a similar tipped edge before making the false wire edge detail. I did have a buck with a square transition where that tipped edge would begin. I used a slapper to gently mark the transition line (3/4" thick plywood bucks) then drew the line with marker and completed the transition with slapper & sharp dolly. Before I trimmed the tipped edge to do the false wire edge, it was only in need of a little shrinking to look like your original fender. Having the extra material to abuse during shrinking made remaining portion look great when the extra was trimmed away.

        Without a buck, I would just mark my line with a pen or pencil & begin developing the transition with slapper and dolly. Ideally, I would make at least one pattern for the cross section of fender & transition point (like one station of a buck) with a marked center line to register with the centerline of the fender. This could be clamped in a vise or hand held to mark & check progress. It is easy to drift off center and have these transition lines become out of parallel with the centerline of the fender, producing a twist to the fender.

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        • #5
          Thanks guys I appreciate the advise. I was planning on making a buck and might make it sturdier now to hammer on that edge.
          Cheers Steve

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