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Japan video Making patch panels -100 spot MIG welds is there a better way ?

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  • Japan video Making patch panels -100 spot MIG welds is there a better way ?

    This video is from Japan where the guy makes a bunch of patch panels to fix rusty edges ,

    it is a lot of work and he has some interesting ideas ,

    But he uses 100s of spot welds from his MIG to connect the pieces of the puzzle ,

    is this strong ? Is there a better way to do this ? is a TIG better if you have it ( but that takes 3 hands)

    With all the rusty cars we drag home it would be nice to know the best way ,

    And yes I turned off the sound .........



    Last edited by abarthdave; 04-05-21, 03:47 AM.

  • #2
    "Different way" might be a more relevant description here than "Best way". He's working with what he has for equipment and taking the advice about making a larger panel from smaller pieces to the limit. He's not letting any welding lens slow him down. His gloves aren't burned or bloody. Invincibility is fun while it lasts. I won't use a cut-off disc or saw like he does- It's not worth the risk. period.

    I have to wonder about his fit-up with all those joints over so many pieces. If there's an average discrepancy on one or more joints in each piece, by the time he's installed many pieces one after another some things may not line up very well.

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    • #3
      The MIG tacks will be strong enough, as long as they have penetrated the full thickness of the metal.

      Buggered if I know how he can work on the floor all day!

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      • #4
        [Quote ]

        I have to wonder about his fit-up with all those joints over so many pieces. If there's an average discrepancy on one or more joints in each piece, by the time he's installed many pieces one after another some things may not line up very well.
        //////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

        That is what I think as well . Making a panel is one thing fitting it is another ..........
        Peter T.
        Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 04-05-21, 11:44 PM.

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        • #5
          Hi

          the reason I posted was often the edges of a stamped panel are rotted , but the rest of the panel is OK ,

          This guy does not seem to have a shrinker stretcher or a bead roller which would help to make the edges ,

          So he works with what he has and also works without simple safety stuff ,

          But what other way would you do his job ?

          Thats what I am trying to learn......

          PS , I do not know how many people work all day like that and still have knees and fingers !

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          • #6
            Making the small bits and sections, like a corner or lower edge, makes sense. It's less convenient to do the repair in place than taking it to the bench (or floor...) but it would require much less welding and fitment issues. By cutting good metal around the damage that's a distance away from the actual damage, that's ??!? to me. Why doesn't he just cut the damaged portion, repair to that cut and skip the extra work. Creating extra work represents (billable) hours that I could probably eliminate so the job could be done faster, bid more competitively and probably done better.

            I've got to do some similar repairs on my old Galaxie and will try to do as much in place as practical instead of adding many feet of welding just because I can.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
              Making the small bits and sections, like a corner or lower edge, makes sense. It's less convenient to do the repair in place than taking it to the bench (or floor...) but it would require much less welding and fitment issues. By cutting good metal around the damage that's a distance away from the actual damage, that's ??!? to me. Why doesn't he just cut the damaged portion, repair to that cut and skip the extra work. Creating extra work represents (billable) hours that I could probably eliminate so the job could be done faster, bid more competitively and probably done better.

              I've got to do some similar repairs on my old Galaxie and will try to do as much in place as practical instead of adding many feet of welding just because I can.
              I thought when he cut it off, "good for him" as it allows access to fix anything behind and get some corrosion protection in there before closing it back.
              To me, seems like a quality repair method. I've cut stuff off and patched and said to myself, "I hope the metal behind is good" and then proceeded to weld the outer patch on. I always felt like I should have done more but too late.
              Pugsy

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 123pugsy View Post

                I thought when he cut it off, "good for him" as it allows access to fix anything behind and get some corrosion protection in there before closing it back.
                To me, seems like a quality repair method. I've cut stuff off and patched and said to myself, "I hope the metal behind is good" and then proceeded to weld the outer patch on. I always felt like I should have done more but too late.
                I understand the reasons for an oversized cut-away, but thought it would make more sense to me to cut away a single larger piece in some areas to be inspected, repaired and reinstalled vs multiple small oversized cuts so close to each other. Doing that would probably help with fitment and could allow better access to finish the final welds after installation vs just using extra filler.

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