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1980 bmw e12 rust work

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  • #31
    before cutting any of the fender, I made some profiles - inside and outside lines. I think I heard peter tommassini say somewhere - "always make profiles"



    Using that as a guide, I trimmed the rib then welded that in place -

    I have a Henrob/cobra 2000 torch , I used the tip no 1 ( 1-3.0mm) yesterday and think it was too big. so I swapped to no 0.5 ( ) which book says is for upto 1.5mm

    Any way weld is much better and heat area is much smaller - A bit of planishing after the tacks kept the join reasonably flush.

    I still blew a few holes, which I filled with bit of cut off.



    I think the original panel is thinner than my patch panel, as it tended with liquifiy much quicker.

    Where the rib touched the fender, I put a stainless steel knife underneath, hoping that the weld would not go through - which seemed to have worked.
    I also sprayed a bit of zinc primer under neath as wont be able to get to it later.



    anyway, I hope this will okay.

    Putting up the inner guide suggested that I've got this reasonably spot on.



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    • #32
      -I watch the fitting doors skins part of David Gardiners video, then proceeded to folder over the fender edge.

      Mine has a body fold line which complicates things, somehow I gently persuaded the metal to fold over and follow the lines.




      then I bent over the wheel well lip and trimmed it to width

      cause I didnt weld the joint at the lip - it will have a visible split

      Also as I bent the lip - the welded joint started to separate - suggesting my weld wasnt good enough. So I lit up the torch and added a bit of filler rod at the joint - which sort of work and sorta made a large hole further inboard.



      I then offered it up to the car for a test fit - kinda fits okay.

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      So cleaned it up then gave a coat of primer to see how good or bad it will be.

      Err - not so good - my weld looks really bad. - fully of holes - can that be redeamable or have I stuffed it?



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      • #33
        personally if it was me i would have another go at making the outer part again, just above your weld line but straight across the lower part of the panel. it may sound a little extreme wanting to cut off that section but, the second one is usually better than the first. i would recommend to keep practicing your welding, it never hurts to keep practicing. you are doing well and you will become better
        thanks neil

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        • #34
          Good start but you need to practice more with the welding.

          Cut some practice pieces the same thickness as the panel about 100mm x 30mm;
          1. Place one piece on a surface that won't suck the heat away; raising it off a metal bench will also work.
          2. With the long edge of the piece running away from you, set the neutral flame and holding the torch with two hands establish a puddle and run it away from you. The inner cone needs to be about 1mm above the weld pool. Repeat the practice until you have straight even beads on the metal.
          3. Turn the test piece over and examine the back for puddle penetration. A good weld just shows through the back all the way along. If you blow holes regularly; move quicker; lower the flame intensity; or use a smaller tip. You may need to do all three.
          4. Once you have nailed the puddle exercise set up a new piece this time running left to right. Establish the puddle and using a filler rod add metal to the puddle to create a weld. examine the finished weld for straightness, penetration and smooth uniform appearance.
          I taught oxy-welding for 24 years and to me your welds look too cold; there should not be any lumps on the surface and no breaks in the penetration.

          You are doing remarkably well for your first attempt! Booking a welding course at TAFE may be an option for you,

          Cheers Charlie

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          • #35
            yes I suppose I was a bit ambitious expecting a good finish from my first go.

            practise I shall.
            Last edited by gdorn; 07-11-20, 02:06 AM.

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            • #36
              Despite my poor welding, once cleanup up primed then painted, it fitted the car reasonably well







              its not perfect, but possible good enough to satisfy the licensing inspector.

              then I moved on the the others side

              I persisted at gas welding practise till I thought I had some idea of how the pieces heated up without blowing holes -
              I was good at making holes! I ended up on the Cobra No 2 nozzel with extension so my hand wouldnt get too hot.

              then I welded up a the 2nd fender- which was much better.





              this side turned out pretty good - weld line is under the rubber trim, so apart from the slight colour difference (hasn't been clear coated or polished yet), its a reasonable match.

              In hindsight, I think I rushed the welding too much - that is not allowing the tacks to cool off . In David Gardeners video- he says just start at one end and keep welding without stopping!

              The bottom didn't fit quite a well as the other side ( about 3mm short)-

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              • #37
                Following on form this work, I then took the car for its 2nd inspection - unfortunately it failed - this time due to odometer not working and the reverse gear (automatic) didn't engage fast enough when activated.

                So I've left it for now till I can get it up on hoist and replace the transmission with a spare I have.


                Thanks to all those who offered me advice, most of it worked well for me and I think for a complete novice ( my first panel welded and first piece of creating a complex 3D shape) - I enjoyed the learning experience.

                chow

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                • #38
                  Hard luck with the gearbox and well done with the acceptable panel repairs,

                  Cheers Charlie

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by gdorn View Post
                    Following on form this work, I then took the car for its 2nd inspection - unfortunately it failed - this time due to odometer not working and the reverse gear (automatic) didn't engage fast enough when activated.

                    So I've left it for now till I can get it up on hoist and replace the transmission with a spare I have.


                    Thanks to all those who offered me advice, most of it worked well for me and I think for a complete novice ( my first panel welded and first piece of creating a complex 3D shape) - I enjoyed the learning experience.

                    chow
                    For your first attempt of a patch panel I think you have done well ,it will be easier the next time and easier again the time after that ,+ you will learn better and quicker ways WELL DONE !
                    Peter T.

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                    • #40
                      Good progress. ! Slow the torch speed down as it doesn't seem to have great penetration. Try a standard torch on 2psi and see how you go. i don't know if the parent metal was coated but try some CA3 ( ? Pete will correct me !) cold rolled steel. It fuses like butter with a Harris torch. I have been a mig guy for 30 years but when I was taught how to gas weld my poor old Uni Mig was relegated to building trailers and work benches. you're doing well.

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