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  • #16
    I found a free .pdf of "The Five Orders of Architecture"

    Great write-ups!

    http://www.chenarch.com/images/arch-...ive-Orders.pdf

    Jake

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    • cliffrod
      cliffrod commented
      Editing a comment
      Very cool- great to see you here, Jake. Welcome to the forum.

  • #17
    Hi Jake welcome to the forum
    Peter T.

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    • #18
      Thanks fellas, happy to be here.

      I used a lot of what you're talking about (although I was unaware of any of the technical terms) for a back half I did for a guy on a CB350. First, the rear swing arm has been stretched 2" to lengthen the wheelbase a bit, and give it a more "racey" feel and allow room for the monoshock. Second, you'll see the monoshock and upper swing arm brace are perpendicular to the angled tube supporting the seat hoop, which is also parallel to the vertical braces on the swing arm. The seat hoop maintains the same horizon line as the bottom of the tank, although slightly elevated (a seat pan will match the bottom tank line (I hope, I'm not making it). In addition, that horizon line is slightly inclined to the rear to give the bike an aggressive look., although it's a bit difficult to see in this picture as it's on uneven ground. Finally, the rear hoop ends in front of the rear axle centerline, and vertex of the tire, again to aid in the aggressive look.



      Click image for larger version  Name:	Raleigh Motor Bike.jpg Views:	0 Size:	229.6 KB ID:	1984

      Stock bike for comparison's sake:

      Click image for larger version  Name:	Stock CB350.jpg Views:	0 Size:	98.6 KB ID:	1987
      Last edited by memphisrain; 10-25-2019, 02:31 PM.

      Comment


      • #19
        Originally posted by memphisrain View Post
        Thanks fellas, happy to be here.

        I used a lot of what you're talking about (although I was unaware of any of the technical terms) for a back half I did for a guy on a CB350. First, the rear swing arm has been stretched 2" to lengthen the wheelbase a bit, and give it a more "racey" feel and allow room for the monoshock. Second, you'll see the monoshock and upper swing arm brace are perpendicular to the angled tube supporting the seat hoop, which is also parallel to the vertical braces on the swing arm. The seat hoop maintains the same horizon line as the bottom of the tank, although slightly elevated (a seat pan will match the bottom tank line (I hope, I'm not making it). In addition, that horizon line is slightly inclined to the rear to give the bike an aggressive look., although it's a bit difficult to see in this picture as it's on uneven ground. Finally, the rear hoop ends in front of the rear axle centerline, and vertex of the tire, again to aid in the aggressive look.



        Click image for larger version Name:	Raleigh Motor Bike.jpg Views:	0 Size:	229.6 KB ID:	1984

        Stock bike for comparison's sake:

        {"alt":"Click image for larger version Name:\tStock CB350.jpg Views:\t0 Size:\t98.6 KB ID:\t1987","data-align":"none","data-":"1987","data-size":"full"}
        It's great to see what you're working on, Jake. I had to learn about most of this design theory & application along the way and after the fact. Being able to articulate the specifics has helped a lot when discussing projects with patrons. When I can easily explain the "why", it builds confidence in relationships and ultimately in your portfolio. That's the end goal. Hopefully discussing it here might help others do the same.

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        • #20
          When developing a 3D composition, especially from 2D methods, it's important to understand the difference between drawing a line and creating an edge. Many people don't actively consider this fact preemptively. When the actual 3D form is made, it can be difficult to justify it with the 2D renderings. Drawing several views of the same object can help, but only if these drawings represent a shape with edges that can properly transition between the various representations.

          i have worked with many drawings of sculpture projects that lack complete information. Usually there will be areas that are just shaded. Big fail. I can't carve a shadow. I have to create shape that creates shadow while also carving something in that shadowed area. Drawing a curved or complex shape to be made from metal presents the same challenges. Adding a few scribbles isn't enough and Miscommunication is a very real risk. Sometimes a fanciful shape will be shown from one perspective that is completely impractical or impossible to justify with surrounding detail.

          make sure to consider how the proposed shape will create the edge that the line in a drawing describes. Make sure to properly address how shape can cause a line to change, as well as top vs bottom or inside vs outside of the shape. It's not hard to overlook little things, especially if you are working alone. If you're fielding drawing done by someone else, be prepared to address them in a professional manner. Most regular customers don't "see" in shapes- they can only comprehend a finished shape, not the means to achieve that shape. many 2D artists never have to produce or transition their concepts into 3D and will assume the 3D expert will automatically know what they mean, That's why I strive to do as much of not all of my own artwork in 2D and 3D. Compared to others I see as talented artists, I'm not a very good 2D artist or draftsman. But, if I draw it, I can address all the pitfalls I can recognize as soon as possible. I get better at every job. Practice is always good.

          Comment


          • #21
            Below is content regarding development of a custom automotive grill. Thought I should include similar content in this thread.

            It's necessary to consider the context and lighting in which the composition will be viewed. When I cut a stone in studio, what it looks like in studio is largely irrelevant. This is a detail many sculptors who are not professionally trained will overlook. 16'-20' to the rafters seems huge compared to an 8' shop ceiling but means nothing compared to the sky outdoors. I have to produce work to demonstrate properly in supremely overwhelming natural light and the giant studio of the outdoors. Natural light is so invasive that it clarifies details (good and bad) that no electric light can. A huge job in studio is tiny outdoors. The big jobs always shrink as they go out the door and then shrink even more once they're installed... It's just another way God and the stone humbles the sculptor.

            Details can be 100% dimensionally accurate per specs but still look vastly different whether indoors or outdoors- especially actual penetrations and negative space between solid surfaces. Solid or continous mass is impacted differently, but is also perceived differently indoors vs outdoors.

            Everything I sculpt and carve is done with these things in mind. The work has to be successful in the context of the installation, not in the artificial and temporary manipulated context of the studio. I have to understand what I think looks right now and what will look right then to succeed.

            An item like a custom automotive grill will be primarily experienced outdoors, not the confines of a small (by comparison) shop. I would address many of these grill considerations with the vehicle outside. Both negative space between solids and illumination of components now hidden in darkness will be more readily perceived. You may find the things now concealed in shadow behind the grill are a bigger issue visually. Addressing such details often impact the more superficial components. Simply moving it outside will shrink details, probably even lightening the shadows between the grill bars. That could make the grill bars appear thicker and the holes between them look not quite as big.

            Natural light is a very powerful factor. It is different in color than much artificial light and is of much higher energy than artificial light. In translating a concept from 2D to 3D, you transition from drawing/defining a line to creating an edge to represent that drawn line. this can be the physical end of a object or the viewed end of a receding shape. Natural light bounces off surrounding objects all around, behind and beneath an object. This additional light can backlight an object and change the way that end or edge of shape is viewed. Detail and edges may be softened or even disappear. It's nice to manage and manipulate light very specifically in studio/shop but it's critical to incorporate significant outdoor study (ideally at different times with different light conditions) into the design process.

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