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Buying almost new car with crash history , check this fix !

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  • Buying almost new car with crash history , check this fix !

    These guys are in China ( I think )

    Watch as they fix major crash damage on a pretty new car !

    Amazing what you can do when the boss says fix it


  • #2
    Actaully pretty standard collision repair. I did heavy collision (salvge rebuilders) for a living for many years. Years ago we would cut them in half (rear clip) and weld them up. Can't tell you how many GM's we rear clipped. Lots of Caddys.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Chris_Hamilton View Post
      Actaully pretty standard collision repair. I did heavy collision (salvge rebuilders) for a living for many years. Years ago we would cut them in half (rear clip) and weld them up. Can't tell you how many GM's we rear clipped. Lots of Caddys.
      crashed cars around here just get scrapped , I have never seen one taken that far apart and fixed , I doubt the Insurance company would want to be libel if it got crashed again and someone got hurt .

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      • #4
        Originally posted by abarthdave View Post

        crashed cars around here just get scrapped , I have never seen one taken that far apart and fixed , I doubt the Insurance company would want to be libel if it got crashed again and someone got hurt .
        Insurance Company would have nothing to do with rebuilding a total loss car. Car gets totalled, goes to a salvage auction and someone buys it and depending on the severity of the damage they then rebuild it. Used to be a very big business, less so today. Days of rebuilding Insurance totals are not completely gone but the construction of cars today makes clipping one correctly impossible. Lot more complex than in the 90's and into the early 2000's. HSLA steel further complicates things.


        Check out Copart.com Thousand of vehicles available. And that is just one company. There are others.

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        • #5
          i saw that video a few weeks ago, i would say none get repaired to that extent in australia or the uk for that matter by the insurance companies. mig plug welding is not a thatcham approved method of repair, the lack of safety gear and a spot welder would indicate a poorly equipped shop in the back streets of china somewhere. parts prices could be really low, along with the labour rates. just because it can be repaired doesn't mean it should be. modern cars are a bit of a disposable entity these days.

          nice to see the guy proud of his completed work, not sure how it would stand up to another impact of the same force...
          thanks neil

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          • #6
            My biggest was on a old Golf GTI The gent was in love with it and paid out an extra 4000 to get it fixed ... this was in the late 90s.

            whole bulk head forward plus chassis legs.... bloody big job when I was young.
            https://www.precisionpanelcraft.co.uk/

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            • #7
              It is illegal to repair a car that has been written-off in Western Australia nowadays. Done to stop the purchasing of a wreck for an inordinately high sum, and then someone stealing your identical looking newish car and transferring the chassis number and engine.

              Good to see the boys were looking after their eyes!

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              • #8
                That definitely looked kind of sketchy, although I agree it was impressive. I wonder if they replaced all the airbags that went off.

                I had a friend that leased a brand new Honda Pilot, in the first week of ownership his wife cut a corner in a city parking garage and side-swiped a concrete pillar. The entire side of the car was heavily damaged, similar to this one except no airbag deployment. The insurance did pay for the car to be fixed -- I think the bill was over $10k -- but they said that if the car wasn't brand new it would have been totaled.

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                • #9
                  Back in the day I tendered on and won a mint Mk 1 Cortina with a pretty decent shunt in the rear. Bought a rear half over the 'phone same day, cut through the rear pillars. Wreck arrived around 12:00 noon on a towtruck. Rear half arrived around 4:00p.m via the local carrier. By that time I had the rear of the car gutted. Went home at 11:00 p.m. with the halves joined up. Car had had a recent respray in 93 enamel, so I got it outside next day, undercoated, blocked back and puffed some Duco over the top with it standing out in the sun. Gave the whole thing a cut next day, reassembled and sold 2 days later. Nice little car. Cut and shuts never let me down. Shop hack was a Marina Ute with a 6 cylinder front half and a warmed up Datsun 1600 up front. Towed tandem trailers etc... Carefree days
                  Cheers, Richard

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                  • #10
                    When parts are cheap , and workers are even cheaper...... ( no 4 weeks holiday pay + 17% loading , no sick pay , no super , no additional 15/20 holidays per Year..etc ..................... ( NOT like here in Australia ) .......That kind of job can be done there in China ....... Here in Australia that type of repair would have been written off immediately, simply because of our labor cost ,..end of story . I have seen new cars here in OZ getting written off with half of that damage ,

                    As a quick assessment , I would say that that particular car repair here in OZ , complete with labor cost including R/R , all parts , replacement of all the air bags , paint , consumables etc etc , would have cost the insurance company about $ 30.000 AU + which is more than 75% of the cost of a new car of the same year and model
                    Peter T.
                    Last edited by Peter Tommasini; 27-04-21, 12:23 AM.

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                    • #11
                      It is important to understand, as Peter has pointed out, that most of the developing countries of the world pay slave-labour rates, or the employees are actually slaves and in perpetual debt to their unscrupulous employers.

                      Think about why some parts or tools are so cheap, next time you are in the shops or online. When I can, I buy the best quality tools and goods, especially if they are made in Australia. I don't mind where they are made overseas, if I know that the employees have fair pay and working conditions.

                      I have never been let down by Australian, U.S., or U.K. made tools,

                      Cheers Charlie

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