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What Chazza does in his spare time

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  • #16
    Your wisdom triumphs again Cliffy!

    I shall give this a go today hopefully. Could you email me your worksheet please? It might be a bit easier for me to read – I hate screens!

    Cheers Charlie

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    • #17
      40 degrees C today, so I got down to the shed early; finished some moulding and decided to fire the furnace.

      I poured 5 boxes and managed to make mistakes on most of them; just shows what a lack of practice does; I don't think I have done any casting since Sep '19.

      Anyway the thermostat housing I showed you earlier during the moulding process appears to have turned out well.

      Photo below; The mushroom shaped thing is where the bush was, the cone below it is where the cone was placed in the cope; and the in-gate, which I cut in the drag with a trowel, can be seen as a rough piece of aluminium. Note the original part number has been reproduced by the sand; the sand is very, very fine.

      The aluminium caps on the end of the sand-core are created when the metal finds any gaps – it flows like water.

      Click image for larger version

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      Clean-up involves sawing, or knocking off the sprue and the flashing. Thin flashing gets sanded off on a disc; heavier flashing gets returned to the crucible along with the sprue, etc.

      The core can be drilled out with a masonry bit; small rotary wire brush; compressed air and a pick. Resin-sand stays quite strong when it has been cooked and can be tricky to remove from hard-to-reach places. if I ever get the sodium-silicate sand to work for me, it can apparently be washed out with water.

      Hope all this wasn't too boring; feel free to ask questions,

      Cheers Charlie

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      • #18
        Man, you're killing me Charlie. I don't need to start doing something else completely different, but I sure do want to do some foundry projects like yours here in the studio. I really like seeing this here.

        Is the sodium silicate sand a one time use item, with only tthe residual that washed away with water being lost or is it reusable? What about the resin sand- can it be broken up and reused at least as a larger aggregate to conserve loose sand or is that not a viable method?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by cliffrod View Post
          Is the sodium silicate sand a one time use item, with only tthe residual that washed away with water being lost or is it reusable? What about the resin sand- can it be broken up and reused at least as a larger aggregate to conserve loose sand or is that not a viable method?
          Not sure about the sodium silicate sand being re-usable; I suspect that it might be.

          The resin sand could probably be recycled; mine is so coarse that I dump it on the foundry floor. What I would really like to find out, is how to treat new sand with a resin binder, but Google has yielded nothing useful so far.

          The boys on my foundry forum are getting great results with sodium-silicate core sand. Once I have got rid of the bugs in my system I will have another go,

          Cheers Charlie

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          • #20
            I've got to get down to the nearby aluminum foundry at some point. Maybe the owner Steve can shed some light on sand details that I can share. They do gravity casting, no pressure casting iirc.

            Before I knew the, Steve rode the flat track race bikes that my best friend Dennis tuned. (Including HD XR750, Ducati bevel/Roundcase 750 Desmo) so,with the family foundry at home they cast some unique parts for their bikes that were otherwise unavailable. I've got the last unused XR750 triple tree they made hanging in my shop as a souvenir. Steve's father (who started and ran the foundry until recently) died over Christmas and I wasn't able to go to services. Dennis said we could cast new intakes for my Guzzi project down there but still need to get time to get there.

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            • #21
              Nothing like learning details from a tradesman, or artisan, instead of a novice like me. Go for it – I wish I had a foundryman to talk to!

              Cheers Charlie

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